History, 1838–1856, volume C-1 [2 November 1838–31 July 1842]

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
Page 940
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<May 13> of troops engaged in this unlawful, unconstitutional and treasonable enterprize, In monarchical governments, the banishment of criminals, after their trial and legal condemnation, has been frequently resorted to— but the banishment of innocent women and children from house and home and country, to wander in a land of strangers, unprotected and unprovided for, while their husbands and fathers are retained in dungeons, to be tried by some other law, is an act unknown in the annals of history, except in this single instance in the nineteenth century, when it has actually transpired in a Republican State, where the Constitution guarantees to every man the protection of life and property, and the right of trial by jury. These are outrages which would put monarchy to the blush, and from which the most despotic tyrants of the dark ages would turn away with shame and disgust— In these proceedings, has en[HC 3:353]rolled her name on the list of immortal fame; her transactions will be handed down the stream of time to the latest posterity, who will read with wonder and astonishment the history of proceedings which are without a parallel in the annal of time. Why should the authorities of the strain at a gnat and swallow a camel? Why be so strictly legal as to compel me, through all the forms of a slow and legal prosecution previous to my enlargement, out of a pretence of respect to the laws of the Statute, which have been openly trampled upon and disregarded towards us from the first to the last? Why not include me in the general, wholesale banishment of our Society, that I may support my family which are now reduced to beggary in a land of strangers. But when the authorities of the shall redress all these wrongs; shall punish the guilty according to law; and shall restore my family and friends to all the rights of which we have been unlawfully deprived, both in and all other Counties; and shall pay all the damages which we as a people have sustained, then I shall believe them sincere in their professed zeal for law and justice. then shall I be convinced that I can have a fair trial in the . But until then, I hereby solemnly protest against being tried in this , with the full and conscientious conviction, that I have no just grounds to expect a fair and impartial trial. I therefore most sincerely pray your Honor, and all the authorities of the , to either banish me without further prosecution; or I freely consent to a trial before a Judiciary of the . With sentiments of high consideration and due respect I have the honor to subscribe myself, your Honor’s most humble and obedient &c — To —”
14 May 1839 • Tuesday
<Joseph visits 14> Tuesday 14. I returned to
15–16 May 1839 • Wednesday–Thursday
<15> Wednesday and Thursday 15 & 16. was engaged in a variety of business relating to the general welfare of the Church.
17 May 1839 • Friday
<17> “ May 17. 1839 To the Editors of the Quincy Whig— Gentlemen— Some letters in your paper have appeared over the Signature of in relation to our affairs with . We consider it is ’s privilege to express his opinion in relation to political or religious matters, and we [p. 940]
May 13 of troops engaged in this unlawful, unconstitutional and treasonable enterprize, In monarchical governments, the banishment of criminals, after their trial and legal condemnation, has been frequently resorted to— but the banishment of innocent women and children from house and home and country, to wander in a land of strangers, unprotected and unprovided for, while their husbands and fathers are retained in dungeons, to be tried by some other law, is an act unknown in the annals of history, except in this single instance in the nineteenth century, when it has actually transpired in a Republican State, where the Constitution guarantees to every man the protection of life and property, and the right of trial by jury. These are outrages which would put monarchy to the blush, and from which the most despotic tyrants of the dark ages would turn away with shame and disgust— In these proceedings, has en[HC 3:353]rolled her name on the list of immortal fame; her transactions will be handed down the stream of time to the latest posterity, who will read with wonder and astonishment the history of proceedings which are without a parallel in the annal of time. Why should the authorities of the strain at a gnat and swallow a camel? Why be so strictly legal as to compel me, through all the forms of a slow and legal prosecution previous to my enlargement, out of a pretence of respect to the laws of the Statute, which have been openly trampled upon and disregarded towards us from the first to the last? Why not include me in the general, wholesale banishment of our Society, that I may support my family which are now reduced to beggary in a land of strangers. But when the authorities of the shall redress all these wrongs; shall punish the guilty according to law; and shall restore my family and friends to all the rights of which we have been unlawfully deprived, both in and all other Counties; and shall pay all the damages which we as a people have sustained, then I shall believe them sincere in their professed zeal for law and justice. then shall I be convinced that I can have a fair trial in the . But until then, I hereby solemnly protest against being tried in this , with the full and conscientious conviction, that I have no just grounds to expect a fair and impartial trial. I therefore most sincerely pray your Honor, and all the authorities of the , to either banish me without further prosecution; or I freely consent to a trial before a Judiciary of the . With sentiments of high consideration and due respect I have the honor to subscribe myself, your Honor’s most humble and obedient &c — To —”
14 May 1839 • Tuesday
Joseph visits 14 Tuesday 14. I returned to
15–16 May 1839 • Wednesday–Thursday
15 Wednesday and Thursday 15 & 16. was engaged in a variety of business relating to the general welfare of the Church.
17 May 1839 • Friday
17 “ May 17. 1839 To the Editors of the Quincy Whig— Gentlemen— Some letters in your paper have appeared over the Signature of in relation to our affairs with . We consider it is ’s privilege to express his opinion in relation to political or religious matters, and we [p. 940]
Page 940