History, 1838–1856, volume C-1 [2 November 1838–31 July 1842]

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
Page 866
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<December 10  Memorial to  Legislature.> about 630, besides swords and pistols, we care not so much about, as we do the pay for them;  only we are bound to do military duty, which we are willing to do, and which we  think was sufficiently manifested by the raising of a volunteer company last fall,  at , when called upon by , to raise troops for the frontier.
The arms given up by us, we consider were worth between twelve and fifteen thousand  dollars but we understand they have been greatly damaged since taken, and at  this time, probably would not bring near their former value. And as they were,  both here and in , taken by the Militia, and consequently by  the authority of the , we therefore ask your honorable body to cause an appropriation  to be made by law, whereby we may be paid for them, or otherwise have them returned  to us and the damages made good. The losses sustained by our people in  leaving , are so situated that it is impossible to obtain any  compensation for them by law, because those who have sustained them are  unable to prove those trespasses upon individuals. That the facts do exist,  that the buildings, crops, stock, furniture, rails, timber, &c. of the society, have  been destroyed in , is not doubted by those who are acquainted  in this upper country, and since these trespasses cannot be proved upon  individuals, we ask your honorable body to consider this case, and if,  in your liberality and wisdom, you can conceive it to be proper to make  an appropriation by law to these sufferers, many of whom are still  pressed down with poverty in consequence of their losses, would be able to  pay their debts, and also in some degree be relieved from poverty and woe,  whilst the widows heart would be made to rejoice, and the orphan’s tear  measurably dried up, and the prayers of a grateful people ascend on high,  with thanksgiving and praise, to the author of our existence, for that beneficent act.
In laying our case before your honorable body, we say that we are willing, and  ever have been to conform to the Constitution and Laws of the ,  and of this . We ask in common with others the protection of the laws.  We ask for the privilege guaranteed to all free Citizens of the  and of this to be extended to us, that we may be permitted to settle and  live where we please, and worship God according to the dictates of our conscience  without molestation. And while we ask for ourselves this privilege we are  willing all others should enjoy the same. We now lay our case at the feet  of your legislature, and ask your honorable body to consider it, and do for us,  after mature deliberation, that which your wisdom, patriotism, and philanthropy  may dictate. And we, as in duty bound, will ever pray &c.
, , , , , , , , . A  Committee appointed by the Citizens of to draft this memorial,  and sign it in their behalf— Caldwell Co. Mo. Decr. 10. 1838.”

13 December 1838 • Thursday

<13 High Council met> Thursday 13.
“Agreeable to appointment the standing High Council  met, when it was found that several were absent, who, (some of them) have had  to flee for their lives, therefore it being necessary that those vacancies be filled,  the meeting was called for that purpose, and also, to express each other’s [p. 866]
December 10 Memorial to Legislature. about 630, besides swords and pistols, we care not so much about, as we do the pay for them; only we are bound to do military duty, which we are willing to do, and which we think was sufficiently manifested by the raising of a volunteer company last fall, at , when called upon by , to raise troops for the frontier.
The arms given up by us, we consider were worth between twelve and fifteen thousand dollars but we understand they have been greatly damaged since taken, and at this time, probably would not bring near their former value. And as they were, both here and in , taken by the Militia, and consequently by the authority of the , we therefore ask your honorable body to cause an appropriation to be made by law, whereby we may be paid for them, or otherwise have them returned to us and the damages made good. The losses sustained by our people in leaving , are so situated that it is impossible to obtain any compensation for them by law, because those who have sustained them are unable to prove those trespasses upon individuals. That the facts do exist, that the buildings, crops, stock, furniture, rails, timber, &c. of the society, have been destroyed in , is not doubted by those who are acquainted in this upper country, and since these trespasses cannot be proved upon individuals, we ask your honorable body to consider this case, and if, in your liberality and wisdom, you can conceive it to be proper to make an appropriation by law to these sufferers, many of whom are still pressed down with poverty in consequence of their losses, would be able to pay their debts, and also in some degree be relieved from poverty and woe, whilst the widows heart would be made to rejoice, and the orphan’s tear measurably dried up, and the prayers of a grateful people ascend on high, with thanksgiving and praise, to the author of our existence, for that beneficent act.
In laying our case before your honorable body, we say that we are willing, and ever have been to conform to the Constitution and Laws of the , and of this . We ask in common with others the protection of the laws. We ask for the privilege guaranteed to all free Citizens of the and of this to be extended to us, that we may be permitted to settle and live where we please, and worship God according to the dictates of our conscience without molestation. And while we ask for ourselves this privilege we are willing all others should enjoy the same. We now lay our case at the feet of your legislature, and ask your honorable body to consider it, and do for us, after mature deliberation, that which your wisdom, patriotism, and philanthropy may dictate. And we, as in duty bound, will ever pray &c.
, , , , , , , , . A Committee appointed by the Citizens of to draft this memorial, and sign it in their behalf— Caldwell Co. Mo. Decr. 10. 1838.”

13 December 1838 • Thursday

13 High Council met Thursday 13.
“Agreeable to appointment the standing High Council met, when it was found that several were absent, who, (some of them) have had to flee for their lives, therefore it being necessary that those vacancies be filled, the meeting was called for that purpose, and also, to express each other’s [p. 866]
Page 866