History, 1838–1856, volume C-1 [2 November 1838–31 July 1842]

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
Page 1223
image
<August 25> of you being a deathly sickly hole, and that we have <not> been able in consequence, to  realize any valuable consideration from it, although we have been keeping up appearances  and holding out inducements to encourage <im>migration, that we scarcely think justifiable  in consequence of the mortality that almost invariably awaits those who come from far  distant parts, (And that with a view to enable us to meet our engagements) And now  to be goaded by you, for a breach of good faith, and neglect, and dishonorable conduct.  seems to me to be almost beyond endurance. You are aware that we came from   destitute of every thing but physical force, and had nothing but our energies  and perserverance to rely upon to meet the payment of the extortionate sum, that  you exacted for the land we had of you. Have you no feelings of commiseration?  or is it your design to crush us with a ponderous load, before we are able to walk?  or can you better dispose of the property, than we are doing for your interest, If so,  <to> the alternative. I therefore propose in order to avoid the perplexity and annoyance  that has hitherto attended the transaction, that you come and take the premises  and make the best you can of it; Or stand off and give us an opportunity, that  we may manage the concern, and enable ourselves by the management thereof, to  meet our engagements as was originally contemplated— We have taken a city plot  at (at the head of navigation for vessels of heavy tonnage) on the most  advantageous terms. The proprietors waiting on us for the payment of the plot.  until we can realize the money from the Sales, leaving to ourselves a large  and liberal net profit. We have been making every exertion, and used all the  means at our command, to lay a foundation, that will now begin to enable us  to meet our pecuniary engagements, and no doubt in our minds, to the entire  satisfaction of all those concerned, if they will but exercise a small degree of  patience, and stay a resort to coercive measures, which would kill us in the germ  even before we can (by reason of the Season) begin to bud and blossom, in order to  bring forth a plentiful yield of fruit. I am with considerations of high  respect, your obt. servt. Joseph Smith.”
The , to which the foregoing letters relate, includes all  the Land lying North of the White Purchase to the , and thence on the   South including the best Steam Boat landing— <but is the most sickly part of .>
<25> <see addenda book— page 11.>

26 August 1841 • Thursday

<26> <[see addenda book—] page 27>

27 August 1841 • Friday

<27> Friday 27. Elder died at his residence in in  the 30th. year of his age, in the full hope of a glorious Resurrection. He was  Associate Editor of the Times and Seasons, Colonel in the Nauvoo Legion, and  had done much writing for myself and the Church. <See addenda book page 29.>

28 August 1841 • Saturday

<28> <At a Conference held in Attica, N.Y. 6 branches, 10 Elders, 7 Priests, 5 Teachers, 2 Deacons, and 146 members, were represented.>

31 August 1841 • Tuesday

<31> Tuesday 31
“At a Council of the Quorum of the Twelve <Apostles> at the house of  President . , Augt. 31. 1841 for the purpose of taking into consideration  the situation of the Church. It was resolved unanimously, that as we have  been called upon by the voice of the Conference — — — — — — — to attend to the  business of the Church, assist the Trustee in Trust in his arduous duties, attend  to the settling of Emigrants &c We sensibly feel the great responsibility that is  resting upon us, and will do all in our power to carry out the wishes of the Church  and prove ourselves worthy of the trust reposed in us by the brethren. Resolved  unanimously that so far as may be practicable we will attend to the Councilling [p. 1223]
August 25 of you being a deathly sickly hole, and that we have not been able in consequence, to realize any valuable consideration from it, although we have been keeping up appearances and holding out inducements to encourage immigration, that we scarcely think justifiable in consequence of the mortality that almost invariably awaits those who come from far distant parts, (And that with a view to enable us to meet our engagements) And now to be goaded by you, for a breach of good faith, and neglect, and dishonorable conduct. seems to me to be almost beyond endurance. You are aware that we came from destitute of every thing but physical force, and had nothing but our energies and perserverance to rely upon to meet the payment of the extortionate sum, that you exacted for the land we had of you. Have you no feelings of commiseration? or is it your design to crush us with a ponderous load, before we are able to walk? or can you better dispose of the property, than we are doing for your interest, If so, to the alternative. I therefore propose in order to avoid the perplexity and annoyance that has hitherto attended the transaction, that you come and take the premises and make the best you can of it; Or stand off and give us an opportunity, that we may manage the concern, and enable ourselves by the management thereof, to meet our engagements as was originally contemplated— We have taken a city plot at (at the head of navigation for vessels of heavy tonnage) on the most advantageous terms. The proprietors waiting on us for the payment of the plot. until we can realize the money from the Sales, leaving to ourselves a large and liberal net profit. We have been making every exertion, and used all the means at our command, to lay a foundation, that will now begin to enable us to meet our pecuniary engagements, and no doubt in our minds, to the entire satisfaction of all those concerned, if they will but exercise a small degree of patience, and stay a resort to coercive measures, which would kill us in the germ even before we can (by reason of the Season) begin to bud and blossom, in order to bring forth a plentiful yield of fruit. I am with considerations of high respect, your obt. servt. Joseph Smith.”
The , to which the foregoing letters relate, includes all the Land lying North of the White Purchase to the , and thence on the South including the best Steam Boat landing— but is the most sickly part of .
25 see addenda book— page 11.

26 August 1841 • Thursday

26 [see addenda book—] page 27

27 August 1841 • Friday

27 Friday 27. Elder died at his residence in in the 30th. year of his age, in the full hope of a glorious Resurrection. He was Associate Editor of the Times and Seasons, Colonel in the Nauvoo Legion, and had done much writing for myself and the Church. See addenda book page 29.

28 August 1841 • Saturday

28 At a Conference held in Attica, N.Y. 6 branches, 10 Elders, 7 Priests, 5 Teachers, 2 Deacons, and 146 members, were represented.

31 August 1841 • Tuesday

31 Tuesday 31
“At a Council of the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles at the house of President . , Augt. 31. 1841 for the purpose of taking into consideration the situation of the Church. It was resolved unanimously, that as we have been called upon by the voice of the Conference — — — — — — — to attend to the business of the Church, assist the Trustee in Trust in his arduous duties, attend to the settling of Emigrants &c We sensibly feel the great responsibility that is resting upon us, and will do all in our power to carry out the wishes of the Church and prove ourselves worthy of the trust reposed in us by the brethren. Resolved unanimously that so far as may be practicable we will attend to the Councilling [p. 1223]
Page 1223