History, 1838–1856, volume C-1 [2 November 1838–31 July 1842]

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
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<June 4  s damages> any such treatment as was threatened. However at length from false  and wicked reports, circulated for the worst of purposes, the inhabitants  of the Upper Counties of , commenced hostilities, threatened to  burn our dwellings and even the lives, of our people if we did not move  away, and afterwards, horrid to relate they put their threats into  execution. Our people endeavored to calm the fury of our enemies,  but in vain, for they carried on their depredations to a greater extent  than ever, until most of our people, who lived in places at a distance  from the Towns, had collected together, so, that they might be better able  to escape from the fury of our enemies and be in better condition  to defend their lives, and the little property they had been able to save.  It is probable, that our persecutors might have been deterred from their  purposes, had not wicked and shameful reports been sent to the  of the , who ordered out a very large force to exterminate us; when they  arrived at we were told what were their orders, however they  did not fall upon us, but took several of my friends and made them  prisoners, and the day after, a company of the Militia came to my  house and ordered me to go with them into the Camp. my family at  that time particularly needed my assistance, being much afflicted;  I told them my situation, but remonstrance was in vain, and I was  hurried into the Camp, and was subject to the most cruel treatment  I along with the rest of the Prisoners was ordered to be shot, but it  was providentially over-ruled, we were then ordered to  where our bitterest persecutors resided; before we started, after much  entreaty, I was privilege[d] to visit my family, accompanied with a strong  Guard, I had only time to get a change of linen &c and was hurried  to where the teams were waiting to convey us to the city of  in Jackson County. While there I was subject to continual insult, from  the people who visited us; I had likewise to lie on the floor and had to  cover myself with my mantle, after remaining there for some time, we  were ordered to in Ray County, where our enemies expected  to shoot us; but finding no law to support them in carrying into effect  so strange an act, we were delivered up to the civil law, as soon as we  were so, we were thrust into a dungeon, and our legs were chained  together; in this situation we remained until called before the Court  who ordered us to be sent to , in Clay County, where I was confined  for more than four months, and endured almost every thing but death,  from the nauseous cell, and the wretched food we were obliged to eat,  In the mean time, my family were suffering every privation— Our  enemies carried off nearly every thing of value, until my family  were left almost destitute, my Wife had been but recently confined, and  had to suffer more than tongue can describe, and then in common  with the rest of the people had to move in the month of February, a  distance of two hundred miles in order to escape further persecutions and [p. 953]
June 4 s damages any such treatment as was threatened. However at length from false and wicked reports, circulated for the worst of purposes, the inhabitants of the Upper Counties of , commenced hostilities, threatened to burn our dwellings and even the lives, of our people if we did not move away, and afterwards, horrid to relate they put their threats into execution. Our people endeavored to calm the fury of our enemies, but in vain, for they carried on their depredations to a greater extent than ever, until most of our people, who lived in places at a distance from the Towns, had collected together, so, that they might be better able to escape from the fury of our enemies and be in better condition to defend their lives, and the little property they had been able to save. It is probable, that our persecutors might have been deterred from their purposes, had not wicked and shameful reports been sent to the of the , who ordered out a very large force to exterminate us; when they arrived at we were told what were their orders, however they did not fall upon us, but took several of my friends and made them prisoners, and the day after, a company of the Militia came to my house and ordered me to go with them into the Camp. my family at that time particularly needed my assistance, being much afflicted; I told them my situation, but remonstrance was in vain, and I was hurried into the Camp, and was subject to the most cruel treatment I along with the rest of the Prisoners was ordered to be shot, but it was providentially over-ruled, we were then ordered to where our bitterest persecutors resided; before we started, after much entreaty, I was privileged to visit my family, accompanied with a strong Guard, I had only time to get a change of linen &c and was hurried to where the teams were waiting to convey us to the city of in Jackson County. While there I was subject to continual insult, from the people who visited us; I had likewise to lie on the floor and had to cover myself with my mantle, after remaining there for some time, we were ordered to in Ray County, where our enemies expected to shoot us; but finding no law to support them in carrying into effect so strange an act, we were delivered up to the civil law, as soon as we were so, we were thrust into a dungeon, and our legs were chained together; in this situation we remained until called before the Court who ordered us to be sent to , in Clay County, where I was confined for more than four months, and endured almost every thing but death, from the nauseous cell, and the wretched food we were obliged to eat, In the mean time, my family were suffering every privation— Our enemies carried off nearly every thing of value, until my family were left almost destitute, my Wife had been but recently confined, and had to suffer more than tongue can describe, and then in common with the rest of the people had to move in the month of February, a distance of two hundred miles in order to escape further persecutions and [p. 953]
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