History, 1838–1856, volume F-1 [1 May 1844–8 August 1844]

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
Page 156
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<​June 25​> before me, to answer unto the said complaint and be further dealt with according to law.
“Given under my hand and seal this 24th day of June 1844
Seal
R. F. Smith J. P.”
8½. A. M. called all the troops, and ordered them to form a hollow square, on the public ground near the Court House; and when formed, he [HC 6:562] mounted an old table and addressed them in a most inflammatory manner, exciting the feelings of indignation against Generals Joseph and , which were already burning in their breasts, occasioned by the falsehoods and misrepresentations that were in circulation; giving his assent and sanction to the rumors that had gathered them together, and stating that although they were dangerous men in the community, and guilty of all that they might have alleged against them, still they were in the hands of the law, which must have its course. He continued speaking some 20 or 30 minutes. -[]-
9 ¼ A. M. The came and invited Joseph to walk with him through the troops. Joseph solicited a few moments private conversation with him; which the refused. While refusing, the looked down at his shoes, as though he was ashamed. They then walked through the crowd with Brigadier General and to ’s head quarters. The people appeared quiet until a company of Carthage Greys flocked round the doors of in an uproarious manner, of which notice was sent to the . In the meantime the had ordered the troops to be drawn up in line for Joseph and to pass in front of them, they having requested that they might have a clear view of the Generals Smith. Joseph had a conversation with the for about 10 minutes, when he again pledged the faith of the that he and his friends should be protected from violence.
, the postmaster, said on report of Martial Law, being prolamed in he had stopped the mail and notified the Postmaster General of the State of things in .
From the ’s quarters Joseph and went in front of the lines, in a hollow square of a Company of [HC 6:563] Carthage Greys; at 7 min. before 10, they arrived in front of the lines, and passed before the whole, Joseph being on the right of , and on his left; Elders , and following. Joseph and were introduced by , <​​> about twenty times along the line, as Gen. Joseph Smith and Gen. ; the walking in front on the left. The Carthage Greys refused to receive them by that introduction, and some of the officers threw up their hats, drew their swords, and said they would introduce themselves to the damned Mormons in a different style. The mildly intreated them not to act so rudely, but their excitement increased: <​​> the , however, succeeded in pacifying them by making a speech, and promising them that they should have“ full satisfaction.” Gen. Smith and party returned to their lodgings at 5 min. past 10.
10.30. News reached Joseph at the , that the Carthage Greys had revolted, and were put under guard by . Joseph told all his friends to stay in the two rooms occupied by them in the . [p. 156]
June 25 before me, to answer unto the said complaint and be further dealt with according to law.
“Given under my hand and seal this 24th day of June 1844
Seal
R. F. Smith J. P.”
8½. A. M. called all the troops, and ordered them to form a hollow square, on the public ground near the Court House; and when formed, he [HC 6:562] mounted an old table and addressed them in a most inflammatory manner, exciting the feelings of indignation against Generals Joseph and , which were already burning in their breasts, occasioned by the falsehoods and misrepresentations that were in circulation; giving his assent and sanction to the rumors that had gathered them together, and stating that although they were dangerous men in the community, and guilty of all that they might have alleged against them, still they were in the hands of the law, which must have its course. He continued speaking some 20 or 30 minutes. -[]-
9 ¼ A. M. The came and invited Joseph to walk with him through the troops. Joseph solicited a few moments private conversation with him; which the refused. While refusing, the looked down at his shoes, as though he was ashamed. They then walked through the crowd with Brigadier General and to ’s quarters. The people appeared quiet until a company of Carthage Greys flocked round the doors of in an uproarious manner, of which notice was sent to the . In the meantime the had ordered the troops to be drawn up in line for Joseph and to pass in front of them, they having requested that they might have a clear view of the Generals Smith. Joseph had a conversation with the for about 10 minutes, when he again pledged the faith of the that he and his friends should be protected from violence.
, the postmaster, said on report of Martial Law, being prolamed in he had stopped the mail and notified the Postmaster General of the State of things in .
From the ’s quarters Joseph and went in front of the lines, in a hollow square of a Company of [HC 6:563] Carthage Greys; at 7 min. before 10, they arrived in front of the lines, and passed before the whole, Joseph being on the right of , and on his left; Elders , and following. Joseph and were introduced by , about twenty times along the line, as Gen. Joseph Smith and Gen. ; the walking in front on the left. The Carthage Greys refused to receive them by that introduction, and some of the officers threw up their hats, drew their swords, and said they would introduce themselves to the damned Mormons in a different style. The mildly intreated them not to act so rudely, but their excitement increased: the , however, succeeded in pacifying them by making a speech, and promising them that they should have“ full satisfaction.” Gen. Smith and party returned to their lodgings at 5 min. past 10.
10.30. News reached Joseph at the , that the Carthage Greys had revolted, and were put under guard by . Joseph told all his friends to stay in the two rooms occupied by them in the . [p. 156]
Page 156