History, 1838–1856, volume F-1 [1 May 1844–8 August 1844]

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
Page 28
image
<​May 13​> Council adjourned at 5 p. m.
[5 lines blank]
The Steamer “Maid of Iowa” returned from with 400 Bushels of Corn, and 200 Bushels of Wheat, which had been purchased for the . At 8 p. m., I went on board with Dr. , and visited Captain .
I insert a letter which I received from , and my answer:—
, Novr. 15th. 1843.
“Dear Sir;
I have received your letter in behalf of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints, stating that you understand that I am a candidate for the Presidency, and enquiring what will be my rule of action relative to you as a people, should I be elected.
“I am profoundly grateful for the numerous and strong expressions of the people in my behalf, as a candidate for President of the ; but I do not so consider myself. That must depend upon future events, and upon my sense of duty.
“Should I be a candidate, I can enter into no engagements, make no promises, give no pledges, to any particular portion of the people of the . If I ever enter into that high office, I must go into it free and unfettered, with no guarantees but such as are to be drawn from my whole life, character, and conduct.
“It is not inconsistent with this declaration to say, that I have viewed with a lively interest, the progress of the Latter Day Saints; that I have sympathized in their sufferings under injustice, as it appeared to me, which has been inflicted upon them; and that I think, in common with all other religious communities, they ought to enjoy the security and protection of the constitution and the laws.
I am, with great respect, your friend and obedient servant,
.”
“To
Joseph Smith, Esqre.” [HC 6:376]
, Ill. May 13th. 1844
“Sir:—
Your answer to my inquiry, ‘what would be your rule of action towards the Latter Day Saints, should you be elected President of the ,’ has been under consideration since last November, in the fond expectation that you would give (for every honest citizen has a right to demand it,) to the country, a manifesto of your views of the best method and means which would secure to the people, the whole people, the most freedom, the most happiness, the most union, the most wealth, the most fame, the most glory at home, and the most honor abroad, at the least expense; but I have waited in vain. So far as you have made public declarations, they have been made, like your answer to the above, soft to flatter, rather than solid to feed the people. You seem to abandon all former policy which may have actuated you in the discharge of a statesman’s duty, when the vigor of intellect and the force of virtue should have sought out an everlasting habitation for liberty; when, as a wise man, a true patriot, and a friend to mankind, you should have resolved to ameliorate the awful condition of our bleeding country by a mighty plan of wisdom, righteousness, justice, goodness, and mercy, that would have brought back the golden days of our nation’s youth, vigor, and vivacity, when prosperity crowned the [p. 28]
May 13 Council adjourned at 5 p. m.
[5 lines blank]
The Steamer “Maid of Iowa” returned from with 400 Bushels of Corn, and 200 Bushels of Wheat, which had been purchased for the . At 8 p. m., I went on board with Dr. , and visited Captain .
I insert a letter which I received from , and my answer:—
, Novr. 15th. 1843.
“Dear Sir;
I have received your letter in behalf of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints, stating that you understand that I am a candidate for the Presidency, and enquiring what will be my rule of action relative to you as a people, should I be elected.
“I am profoundly grateful for the numerous and strong expressions of the people in my behalf, as a candidate for President of the ; but I do not so consider myself. That must depend upon future events, and upon my sense of duty.
“Should I be a candidate, I can enter into no engagements, make no promises, give no pledges, to any particular portion of the people of the . If I ever enter into that high office, I must go into it free and unfettered, with no guarantees but such as are to be drawn from my whole life, character, and conduct.
“It is not inconsistent with this declaration to say, that I have viewed with a lively interest, the progress of the Latter Day Saints; that I have sympathized in their sufferings under injustice, as it appeared to me, which has been inflicted upon them; and that I think, in common with all other religious communities, they ought to enjoy the security and protection of the constitution and the laws.
I am, with great respect, your friend and obedient servant,
.”
“To
Joseph Smith, Esqre.” [HC 6:376]
, Ill. May 13th. 1844
“Sir:—
Your answer to my inquiry, ‘what would be your rule of action towards the Latter Day Saints, should you be elected President of the ,’ has been under consideration since last November, in the fond expectation that you would give (for every honest citizen has a right to demand it,) to the country, a manifesto of your views of the best method and means which would secure to the people, the whole people, the most freedom, the most happiness, the most union, the most wealth, the most fame, the most glory at home, and the most honor abroad, at the least expense; but I have waited in vain. So far as you have made public declarations, they have been made, like your answer to the above, soft to flatter, rather than solid to feed the people. You seem to abandon all former policy which may have actuated you in the discharge of a statesman’s duty, when the vigor of intellect and the force of virtue should have sought out an everlasting habitation for liberty; when, as a wise man, a true patriot, and a friend to mankind, you should have resolved to ameliorate the awful condition of our bleeding country by a mighty plan of wisdom, righteousness, justice, goodness, and mercy, that would have brought back the golden days of our nation’s youth, vigor, and vivacity, when prosperity crowned the [p. 28]
Page 28