History, 1838–1856, volume C-1 [2 November 1838–31 July 1842]

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
Page 949
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<June 4  Joseph’s Bill of  Damages> had threatened their lives, and had shot several times at them; Immediately  on hearing this strange intelligence. I made preparations to start, in order,  if possible to allay the feelings of opposition, if not to make arrangements  with those individuals of whom we had made purchases, and to whom I  was responsible and holden for part of the purchase money— I arrived there  on the [blank] day of September, and found the account which I heard was  correct—. Our people were surrounded by a mob, their provisions nearly  exhausted— messengers were immediately sent to the Governor, requesting  protection, but instead of lending any assistance to the oppressed, he  stated that the Quarrel was between the Mormons and the Mob, and  that they must fight it out. Being now almost destitute of provisions  and having suffered great distress, and some of the brethren having  died in consequence of their privations & sufferings, and I had then the  pain of beholding some of my fellow creatures perish in a strange land  from the cruelty of a mob— seeing no prospect of relief, the Brethren  agreed to leave that place and seek a shelter elsewhere, after having  their houses burnt down, their cattle driven away, and much of their property  destroyed— was also petitioned to afford us some assistance  He sent a company of about 100 men, but instead of affording us any  relief, we were told by that he could afford none, in  consequence of the greater part of his Company under their officer  Capt. having mutinied. About 70 Waggons left  for , and during their journey were continually insulted by  the Mob, who threatened to destroy us, and shot at us— In our Journey  several of our friends died and had to be interred without a Coffin &  under such circumstances which were extremely distressing. Immediately  on my arrival at I was informed by  from that a company of about 800 were marching towards  a Settlement of our brethren in , and he advised one of  the officers, that we should immediately go to protect our brethren in   (in what he called White’s Town) until he should get the  Militia to put them down— a company of militia to the number of  sixty who were on their rout to that place, he ordered back, believing as he  said that they were not to be depended upon, and to use his own language  were “damned rotten hearted” agreeable to the advice of  , and a number of our brethren volunteered to go to  to render what assistance they could. My labors having been principally  expended in where I intended to take up my residence and  having a house in building, and having other property there, I hastened  up to that place, and while I was there a number of the Brethren’s houses  were burnt and depredations were continually committed, such as driving  off Horses, Cattle, Sheep, &c &c Being deprived of shelter, and others having no  safety in their houses, which were scattered and being alarmed at the approach  of the Mob. they had to flock together, their sufferings were very great in consequence [p. 949]
June 4 Joseph’s Bill of Damages had threatened their lives, and had shot several times at them; Immediately on hearing this strange intelligence. I made preparations to start, in order, if possible to allay the feelings of opposition, if not to make arrangements with those individuals of whom we had made purchases, and to whom I was responsible and holden for part of the purchase money— I arrived there on the [blank] day of September, and found the account which I heard was correct—. Our people were surrounded by a mob, their provisions nearly exhausted— messengers were immediately sent to the Governor, requesting protection, but instead of lending any assistance to the oppressed, he stated that the Quarrel was between the Mormons and the Mob, and that they must fight it out. Being now almost destitute of provisions and having suffered great distress, and some of the brethren having died in consequence of their privations & sufferings, and I had then the pain of beholding some of my fellow creatures perish in a strange land from the cruelty of a mob— seeing no prospect of relief, the Brethren agreed to leave that place and seek a shelter elsewhere, after having their houses burnt down, their cattle driven away, and much of their property destroyed— was also petitioned to afford us some assistance He sent a company of about 100 men, but instead of affording us any relief, we were told by that he could afford none, in consequence of the greater part of his Company under their officer Capt. having mutinied. About 70 Waggons left for , and during their journey were continually insulted by the Mob, who threatened to destroy us, and shot at us— In our Journey several of our friends died and had to be interred without a Coffin & under such circumstances which were extremely distressing. Immediately on my arrival at I was informed by from that a company of about 800 were marching towards a Settlement of our brethren in , and he advised one of the officers, that we should immediately go to protect our brethren in (in what he called White’s Town) until he should get the Militia to put them down— a company of militia to the number of sixty who were on their rout to that place, he ordered back, believing as he said that they were not to be depended upon, and to use his own language were “damned rotten hearted” agreeable to the advice of , and a number of our brethren volunteered to go to to render what assistance they could. My labors having been principally expended in where I intended to take up my residence and having a house in building, and having other property there, I hastened up to that place, and while I was there a number of the Brethren’s houses were burnt and depredations were continually committed, such as driving off Horses, Cattle, Sheep, &c &c Being deprived of shelter, and others having no safety in their houses, which were scattered and being alarmed at the approach of the Mob. they had to flock together, their sufferings were very great in consequence [p. 949]
Page 949