History, 1838–1856, volume F-1 [1 May 1844–8 August 1844]

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
Page 35
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<​May 16​> [1/2 page blank]
I ordered the Municipal Court to meet at one p. m., and spent the morning on reading.
At one p. m., I presided in Municipal Court. The case of , who had been arrested by Jones on the charge of procuring money at under false pretences, came up on Habeas Corpus. The complainant, , by his counsel, , asked for and obtained an adjournment for one week in order to procure witnesses. The , by his counsel, , objected to the plea, supposing the prosecuting party always ready for trial. The Court decided that it was an important case, and it was not best to be in haste; and if the prisoner is discharged on the merits of the case after a full investigation, he goes free for ever. The majority of the Court decided to adjourn until Thursday next.
I was about home the rest of the day, and read in the [HC 6:379] Neighbor the report of my trial before the Municipal Court on the 8th. inst.
The following appears in the Times and Seasons:—
“Dear Sir:
I have just returned from the north part of this , where I have been on business for our beloved President Joseph Smith, and it feels so good to breathe the pure air of liberty and friendship after spending some three or four days in a swamp, or rather a slough of religious prejudice and political hypocrisy, which are equally nauseous and offensive, that I cannot let this opportunity pass without giving vent to some of my feelings in regard to what passed while I remained at the town of on .
“My principal business was to appear in the Circuit Court as a witness in the case of Joseph Smith vs and , for false imprisonment and using unnecessary force and violence in arresting the plaintiff. [p. 35]
May 16 [1/2 page blank]
I ordered the Municipal Court to meet at one p. m., and spent the morning on reading.
At one p. m., I presided in Municipal Court. The case of , who had been arrested by Jones on the charge of procuring money at under false pretences, came up on Habeas Corpus. The complainant, , by his counsel, , asked for and obtained an adjournment for one week in order to procure witnesses. The , by his counsel, , objected to the plea, supposing the prosecuting party always ready for trial. The Court decided that it was an important case, and it was not best to be in haste; and if the prisoner is discharged on the merits of the case after a full investigation, he goes free for ever. The majority of the Court decided to adjourn until Thursday next.
I was about home the rest of the day, and read in the [HC 6:379] Neighbor the report of my trial before the Municipal Court on the 8th. inst.
The following appears in the Times and Seasons:—
“Dear Sir:
I have just returned from the north part of this , where I have been on business for our beloved President Joseph Smith, and it feels so good to breathe the pure air of liberty and friendship after spending some three or four days in a swamp, or rather a slough of religious prejudice and political hypocrisy, which are equally nauseous and offensive, that I cannot let this opportunity pass without giving vent to some of my feelings in regard to what passed while I remained at the town of on .
“My principal business was to appear in the Circuit Court as a witness in the case of Joseph Smith vs and , for false imprisonment and using unnecessary force and violence in arresting the plaintiff. [p. 35]
Page 35