History, 1838–1856, volume F-1 [1 May 1844–8 August 1844]

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
Page 54
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<​May 25​> were two indictments found against me, one charging me with false swearing on the testimony of and , and one charging me with polygamy or something else, on the testimony of that I had told him so! the particulars of which I shall learn hereafter. There was much false swearing before the Grand Jury. swore so hard that I had received stolen property &c, that his testimony was rejected. I heard that had come into the ; I therefore instructed the officers to arrest him for threatening to take life, &c.
I had a long talk with , my brother , , , , , and others, and concluded not to keep out of the way of the officers any longer.
At 2 P. M. I was in council in my north room, and heard the letters from Elder read, and instructed to write an answer, which he did as follows:
, May 25th., 1844.
, Esqr.
Sir:—
Yours of April 30th. is received. The council convened this afternoon, and after investigation directed an answer, which must be brief to correspond with a press of business.
“All the items you refer to had previously received the deliberation of the Council. [HC 6:405]
“Messrs. and , will doubtless be in before you receive this, from whom you will learn all things relative to &c. Our great success at present depends upon our faith in the doctrine of election; and our faith must be made manifest by our works, and every honorable exertion made to elect Gen. Smith.
“Agricultural pursuits will take care of themselves, regulating their own operations, and the rich also; but the poor we must gather and take care of, for they are to inherit the kingdom.
will be a ‘corner stake of Zion’ for ever we most assuredly expect. Here is the and the ordinances, extend where else we may.
“Press the bills through the two Houses if possible; if Congress will not pass them let them do as they have a mind with them. If they will not pass our bills, but will give us ‘something’ they will give what they please, and it will be at our option to accept or reject.
“Men who are afraid of ‘hazarding their influence’ in the council or political arena are good for nothing; ’tis the fearless, undaunted, and persevering, who will gain the conquest of the forum.
, Esqr., is about to resign the Post Office at in favor of Gen. Joseph Smith, the founder of the ; he has the oldest petitions now on file in the General Post Office for that station, and has an undoubted claim over every other petitioners by being the founder and support<​ers​> of the , and by the voice of nineteen twentieths of the people, and every sacred consideration; and it is the wish of the council that you engage the delegation to use their influence to secure the office to Gen. Smith without fail, and have them ready to act on the arrival of ’s resignation, and before too if expedient.
“We are also writing to , Esqr., U. S. Attorney for the district [p. 54]
May 25 were two indictments found against me, one charging me with false swearing on the testimony of and , and one charging me with polygamy or something else, on the testimony of that I had told him so! the particulars of which I shall learn hereafter. There was much false swearing before the Grand Jury. swore so hard that I had received stolen property &c, that his testimony was rejected. I heard that had come into the ; I therefore instructed the officers to arrest him for threatening to take life, &c.
I had a long talk with , my brother , , , , , and others, and concluded not to keep out of the way of the officers any longer.
At 2 P. M. I was in council in my north room, and heard the letters from Elder read, and instructed to write an answer, which he did as follows:
, May 25th., 1844.
, Esqr.
Sir:—
Yours of April 30th. is received. The council convened this afternoon, and after investigation directed an answer, which must be brief to correspond with a press of business.
“All the items you refer to had previously received the deliberation of the Council. [HC 6:405]
“Messrs. and , will doubtless be in before you receive this, from whom you will learn all things relative to &c. Our great success at present depends upon our faith in the doctrine of election; and our faith must be made manifest by our works, and every honorable exertion made to elect Gen. Smith.
“Agricultural pursuits will take care of themselves, regulating their own operations, and the rich also; but the poor we must gather and take care of, for they are to inherit the kingdom.
will be a ‘corner stake of Zion’ for ever we most assuredly expect. Here is the and the ordinances, extend where else we may.
“Press the bills through the two Houses if possible; if Congress will not pass them let them do as they have a mind with them. If they will not pass our bills, but will give us ‘something’ they will give what they please, and it will be at our option to accept or reject.
“Men who are afraid of ‘hazarding their influence’ in the council or political arena are good for nothing; ’tis the fearless, undaunted, and persevering, who will gain the conquest of the forum.
, Esqr., is about to resign the Post Office at in favor of Gen. Joseph Smith, the founder of the ; he has the oldest petitions now on file in the General Post Office for that station, and has an undoubted claim over every other petitioner by being the founder and supporters of the , and by the voice of nineteen twentieths of the people, and every sacred consideration; and it is the wish of the council that you engage the delegation to use their influence to secure the office to Gen. Smith without fail, and have them ready to act on the arrival of ’s resignation, and before too if expedient.
“We are also writing to , Esqr., U. S. Attorney for the district [p. 54]
Page 54