History, 1838–1856, volume E-1 [1 July 1843–30 April 1844]

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
Page 1762
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<​November​> felt fearful he would not be able to perform the journey, but the thought of meeting Brothers [Noah] Rogers and , the expectation of seeing some of the Twelve, and attending conference with a large collection of brethren, stimulated him to great faith, and he stood the ride far beyond my expectation. The stage was crowded inside with ladies, and we were obliged to take an outside seat; for one of that kind it was very good, much of the way I supported him in my arms, and when I thought he was getting fatigued, I would secretly place my hands upon him and raise my desire to Him who is able to save and strengthen. We staid in with Sister Whitmore; her untiring kindness to him is long to be remembered. He was able to attend conference but little, he was administered to by some of the Twelve once or twice while there. I was with him continually while I staid in . I nursed him as well as I knew (as you know I am not very skilful:) I daily rubbed him with flannels, anointed him with consecrated oil in the name of the Lord, and prayed with him, and was often assisted by Brother Rogers. When I left for New Bedford Brother Rogers took charge of him; they went to on business for the mission; back to and then came on to New Bedford; when I was away from him a few days the change was more visible than when I saw him daily. I was surprised at the change, and knew at that rate he could live but a few days. I asked him particularly how he felt, he would at no time betray the least fear that he should not live, notwithstanding he closed up all his business before we left New Bedford. I believe he was determined to die as near the place of our destined mission as possible, and therefore nothing would deter him from his course. When I saw his feeble state and knew the privations he would naturally have to suffer by a sea voyage, I could not help speaking discouragingly to him on the subject, and told him of all the privations he would <​have​> of necessity to undergo, but nothing would discourage him: I believe the reason he would never betray any fear of not living, was because if he did so, our faith for him might fail, and this was what he depended on to carry him to the last extremity.— Indeed it was so, the mate of the ship (not knowing the cause) observed to me, he was the st[r]ongest constitutioned man he ever saw in his life, for he never saw a man live so long that was so reduced.
After we left New Bedford we had rough weather, and there were but 2 or 3 days we thought it prudent to take him on deck. He kept his berth the most of the time, we took the best care possible of him, daily rubbing him with flannels and anointing him in the name of the Lord; when he was afflicted with pains in any part of his system, we used to administer to him by the laying on of hands, and he never failed of receiving immediate relief, but to approach the root of the disease, we never had power to affect it, but it kept its regular march reducing him from day to day, till I could clasp with my hand within one fourth of an inch the calf of his leg, making it but a little larger than my wrist, though his appetite continued good: he coughed and raised continually.
Soon after we sailed, he got so weak that if he slept too long, he would get into a profuse sweat, and we found it necessary to watch him; [p. 1762]
November felt fearful he would not be able to perform the journey, but the thought of meeting Brothers [Noah] Rogers and , the expectation of seeing some of the Twelve, and attending conference with a large collection of brethren, stimulated him to great faith, and he stood the ride far beyond my expectation. The stage was crowded inside with ladies, and we were obliged to take an outside seat; for one of that kind it was very good, much of the way I supported him in my arms, and when I thought he was getting fatigued, I would secretly place my hands upon him and raise my desire to Him who is able to save and strengthen. We staid in with Sister Whitmore; her untiring kindness to him is long to be remembered. He was able to attend conference but little, he was administered to by some of the Twelve once or twice while there. I was with him continually while I staid in . I nursed him as well as I knew (as you know I am not very skilful:) I daily rubbed him with flannels, anointed him with consecrated oil in the name of the Lord, and prayed with him, and was often assisted by Brother Rogers. When I left for New Bedford Brother Rogers took charge of him; they went to on business for the mission; back to and then came on to New Bedford; when I was away from him a few days the change was more visible than when I saw him daily. I was surprised at the change, and knew at that rate he could live but a few days. I asked him particularly how he felt, he would at no time betray the least fear that he should not live, notwithstanding he closed up all his business before we left New Bedford. I believe he was determined to die as near the place of our destined mission as possible, and therefore nothing would deter him from his course. When I saw his feeble state and knew the privations he would naturally have to suffer by a sea voyage, I could not help speaking discouragingly to him on the subject, and told him of all the privations he would have of necessity to undergo, but nothing would discourage him: I believe the reason he would never betray any fear of not living, was because if he did so, our faith for him might fail, and this was what he depended on to carry him to the last extremity.— Indeed it was so, the mate of the ship (not knowing the cause) observed to me, he was the strongest constitutioned man he ever saw in his life, for he never saw a man live so long that was so reduced.
After we left New Bedford we had rough weather, and there were but 2 or 3 days we thought it prudent to take him on deck. He kept his berth the most of the time, we took the best care possible of him, daily rubbing him with flannels and anointing him in the name of the Lord; when he was afflicted with pains in any part of his system, we used to administer to him by the laying on of hands, and he never failed of receiving immediate relief, but to approach the root of the disease, we never had power , but it kept its regular march reducing him from day to day, till I could clasp with my hand within one fourth of an inch the calf of his leg, making it but a little larger than my wrist, though his appetite continued good: he coughed and raised continually.
Soon after we sailed, he got so weak that if he slept too long, he would get into a profuse sweat, and we found it necessary to watch him; [p. 1762]
Page 1762