History, 1838–1856, volume E-1 [1 July 1843–30 April 1844]

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
Page 1781
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<​November 25​> such Council Counsel, for we feel to do it in the name of the Lord.
When you have built up a church at , so as to warrant the expense, it will be wisdom for you to send, or take your wife to , so says President Joseph.
All things go on smoothly here, as to the reports circulated while we were in , there is nothing of them. Brother Joseph has commenced living in his , and enjoys himself well. He has raised a sign entitled “,” and has all the best company in the . Many strangers from abroad call on him feeling perfect liberty so to do Since he has made his house public, and it is exerting a blessed influence on the public mind. The has been progressing rapidly until the recent frosts. The walls are now above the windows of the first story, and some of the circular windows are partly laid. The brethren of the Twelve have all arrived home, are tolerably well, and their families, except who has been very sick, and is yet, though at last report rather better. No prospect of any of the Twelve leaving home this winter, [HC 6:82] that we know of. has arrived with his company from &c. generally in good spirits. The Devil howls some— may be you will hear him as far as , for there cannot a black leg be guilty of any crime in , but somebody will lay it to the servants of God. We shall give the substance of this communication to your wife, same mail. We remain your brother in the new and <​Everlasting​> covenant, In behalf of the Quorum. President. Clerk.”
26 November 1843 • Sunday
<​26​> Sunday 26. I met with , the Twelve, and others, in council with at the , concerning petitioning Congress for redress of grievances— read to him the affidavits of , , , , and , taken before the Municipal court on Habeas Corpus; and conversed with him thereon.
At 11 a.m. Elder preached in the Assembly room.
In the eve<​ning​> Elder lectured in the . Rainy, muddy day.
27 November 1843 • Monday
<​27​> Monday 27. Wet day. Being quite unwell, I staid at home.
28 November 1843 • Tuesday
<​28​> Tuesday 28. At home. wrote a memorial to Congress.
29 November 1843 • Wednesday
<​29​> Wednesday 29. At home. Clear and cold. left for home, taking with him a copy of the Memorial, to get signers in
I here insert a copy of the [HC 6:83] memorial:—
“To the Honorable the Senate and House of Representatives of the , in Congress assembled:
“The Memorial of the undersigned inhabitants of in the State of Illinois, respectfully shewet:
“That they belong to the Society of Latter day Saints, commonly called Mormons, that a portion of our people commenced settling in , Missouri, in the summer of 1831, where they purchased lands and settled upon them with the intention and expectation of becoming permanent citizens in common with others.
“From a very early period after the settlement began, a very unfriendly feeling was manifested by the neighboring people, and, as the Society increased, this unfriendly Spirit also increased, until it degenerated into a cruel and unrelenting [p. 1781]
November 25 such Counsel, for we feel to do it in the name of the Lord.
When you have built up a church at , so as to warrant the expense, it will be wisdom for you to send, or take your wife to , so says President Joseph.
All things go on smoothly here, as to the reports circulated while we were in , there is nothing of them. Brother Joseph has commenced living in his , and enjoys himself well. He has raised a sign entitled “,” and has all the best company in the . Many strangers from abroad call on him feeling perfect liberty so to do Since he has made his house public, and it is exerting a blessed influence on the public mind. The has been progressing rapidly until the recent frosts. The walls are now above the windows of the first story, and some of the circular windows are partly laid. The brethren of the Twelve have all arrived home, are tolerably well, and their families, except who has been very sick, and is yet, though at last report rather better. No prospect of any of the Twelve leaving home this winter, [HC 6:82] that we know of. has arrived with his company from &c. generally in good spirits. The Devil howls some— may be you will hear him as far as , for there cannot a black leg be guilty of any crime in , but somebody will lay it to the servants of God. We shall give the substance of this communication to your wife, same mail. We remain your brother in the new and Everlasting covenant, In behalf of the Quorum. President. Clerk.”
26 November 1843 • Sunday
26 Sunday 26. I met with , the Twelve, and others, in council with at the , concerning petitioning Congress for redress of grievances— read to him the affidavits of , , , , and , taken before the Municipal court on Habeas Corpus; and conversed with him thereon.
At 11 a.m. Elder preached in the Assembly room.
In the evening Elder lectured in the . Rainy, muddy day.
27 November 1843 • Monday
27 Monday 27. Wet day. Being quite unwell, I staid at home.
28 November 1843 • Tuesday
28 Tuesday 28. At home. wrote a memorial to Congress.
29 November 1843 • Wednesday
29 Wednesday 29. At home. Clear and cold. left for home, taking with him a copy of the Memorial, to get signers in
I here insert a copy of the [HC 6:83] memorial:—
“To the Honorable the Senate and House of Representatives of the , in Congress assembled:
“The Memorial of the undersigned inhabitants of in the State of Illinois, respectfully shewet:
“That they belong to the Society of Latter day Saints, commonly called Mormons, that a portion of our people commenced settling in , Missouri, in the summer of 1831, where they purchased lands and settled upon them with the intention and expectation of becoming permanent citizens in common with others.
“From a very early period after the settlement began, a very unfriendly feeling was manifested by the neighboring people, and, as the Society increased, this unfriendly Spirit also increased, until it degenerated into a cruel and unrelenting [p. 1781]
Page 1781