History, 1838–1856, volume E-1 [1 July 1843–30 April 1844]

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
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<​August 28​> my red children and will most cheerfully do them all the good in my power as to do good is what I always delight in. Should the appoint me as your Agent to transact your business for you I shall cheerfully comply; and will always do the best I can for you but you know I cannot do any thing in this matter except it be appointed me by the authorities of our land. The bearer will bring you a map shewing the boundaries of your land which I hope you will be able to <​understand; he will also be able to​> tell you more about this business. The Mormons are your friends and they are the friends of all men, and I have the very best of feelings to all men and especially towards you my children. I wish you well, and hope the great God will bless you and abundantly supply you with every good thing, and that peace and prosperity may for ever attend you and your children. And now my children be friendly to each other and be at peace with each other and with all men, for peace is what I seek for all my friends; and may the great Spirit bless you all my children is the sincere wish of your father. Your father.”
This letter was put into the hands of the principal Indian, a young man of good stature and they took their departure.
29 August 1843 • Tuesday
<​29​> Tuesday Elder paid a visit to , , Long Island, and baptized and confirmed him next day.
I held Mayors court, and tried several cases. was bound over to keep the peace for six months. Previous to the close of the trial he gave up his license as an Elder, to the Church Recorder.
30 August 1843 • Wednesday
<​30​> Wednesday The Neighbor publishes the following article:
“The following is extracted from the ‘ Bee’ and reflects great credit upon the writer. Whoever ‘Viator’ is he has proven himself to be a man of sound sense and discernment, and of no ordinary legal talents. The sentiments advocated are those that we have always contended for: it is the only common sense view of the subject that can be taken; and we think that on a ‘sober second thought’ when the film of superstition and prejudice is removed, it is the only light that it will be seen in by all intelligent men.
“Vested rights of .
Mr. Editor:— After an abrupt leave, I am in again, and having been for many years what is called a constitutional man, and feeling a deep interest in the common welfare of all, so far as the rights of ‘Life, Liberty, and the pursuit of happiness’ are concerned, you will pardon me as a legal advocate of vested rights, (not your religious tenets, or any other’s, for I consider them as a matter connected with the soul) for once more offering you a little ‘Bee Bread’.
I am much pleased with the liberal powers of the charter of the goodly city of . The vested rights in that public document, are sufficient for all necessary purposes of a people whose greatest object appears to be to benefit mankind in this world, and happify them in the next. It is evident on the face of the instrument in question, that the Legislature of , or more properly the people of through their representatives, have vested in the corporate body of , over a certain district of territory which may be increased in size at pleasure, all the rights, privileges and powers, which the said State possessed [p. 1710]
August 28 my red children and will most cheerfully do them all the good in my power as to do good is what I always delight in. Should the appoint me as your Agent to transact your business for you I shall cheerfully comply; and will always do the best I can for you but you know I cannot do any thing in this matter except it be appointed me by the authorities of our land. The bearer will bring you a map shewing the boundaries of your land which I hope you will be able to understand; he will also be able to tell you more about this business. The Mormons are your friends and they are the friends of all men, and I have the very best of feelings to all men and especially towards you my children. I wish you well, and hope the great God will bless you and abundantly supply you with every good thing, and that peace and prosperity may for ever attend you and your children. And now my children be friendly to each other and be at peace with each other and with all men, for peace is what I seek for all my friends; and may the great Spirit bless you all my children is the sincere wish of your father. Your father.”
This letter was put into the hands of the principal Indian, a young man of good stature and they took their departure.
29 August 1843 • Tuesday
29 Tuesday Elder paid a visit to , , Long Island, and baptized and confirmed him next day.
I held Mayors court, and tried several cases. was bound over to keep the peace for six months. Previous to the close of the trial he gave up his license as an Elder, to the Church Recorder.
30 August 1843 • Wednesday
30 Wednesday The Neighbor publishes the following article:
“The following is extracted from the ‘ Bee’ and reflects great credit upon the writer. Whoever ‘Viator’ is he has proven himself to be a man of sound sense and discernment, and of no ordinary legal talents. The sentiments advocated are those that we have always contended for: it is the only common sense view of the subject that can be taken; and we think that on a ‘sober second thought’ when the film of superstition and prejudice is removed, it is the only light that it will be seen in by all intelligent men.
“Vested rights of .
Mr. Editor:— After an abrupt leave, I am in again, and having been for many years what is called a constitutional man, and feeling a deep interest in the common welfare of all, so far as the rights of ‘Life, Liberty, and the pursuit of happiness’ are concerned, you will pardon me as a legal advocate of vested rights, (not your religious tenets, or any other’s, for I consider them as a matter connected with the soul) for once more offering you a little ‘Bee Bread’.
I am much pleased with the liberal powers of the charter of the goodly city of . The vested rights in that public document, are sufficient for all necessary purposes of a people whose greatest object appears to be to benefit mankind in this world, and happify them in the next. It is evident on the face of the instrument in question, that the Legislature of , or more properly the people of through their representatives, have vested in the corporate body of , over a certain district of territory which may be increased in size at pleasure, all the rights, privileges and powers, which the said State possessed [p. 1710]
Page 1710