History, 1838–1856, volume E-1 [1 July 1843–30 April 1844]

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
Page 1858
image
9 January 1844 • Tuesday
<​January 9​> Tuesday 9. At home.
I insert the following from the Neighbor, as a specimen of the respect which the mob has for law or justice:—
Disgraceful affair at .
On Tuesday last, , one of our officers went to for the purpose of arresting Milton Cook, on the charge of bastardy, and bringing him before , Justice of the Peace of this , before whom affidavit had been made to that effect. He found the accused in Bartlett’s grocery, () and arrested him. Cook had a gun that he said he had loaded for the purpose, and would make a hole through the if he molested him, and swore he would not be taken. and others, then stepped forward to his assistance, and said that they had sworn to stand by him, and that he should not go. He then returned with his process to the , and told him what had ocourred. Mr. then summoned eleven men to go along with the , and assist <​him​> in bringing the delinquent. They went out and drove to the grocery where they expected to find him, but he was not there; they then went out for a short time without making known their business, when they saw an armed force gathering. [HC 6:171]
They shortly afterwards returned to the grocery, and saw him there, where he swore he would not be taken— there was also an armed force standing in the door, who also swore he should not be taken. The officer having the process; Mr. Markham, and , stepped forward and wished to reason the case with them; the officer, at the same time demanding their assistance; they were met with an armed force of about twenty, four of whom stood in the doorway; two with guns and bayonets, and two with pistols. The two having the bayonets charged directly at Mr. Markham and swore they would run him through and rushed upon him with their bayonets. He however warded off their blows with his arm, and the bayonet glanced and struck Mr in the abdomen, the bayonet went through his clothes scratched his body, and glanced off without doing any further injury, other than giving him a slight cut in the hand. Those having the pistols then attempted to shoot, when Mr. Markham seized the hand of one of them that held the pistol, and prevented him from firing— The other put his pistol to ’s breast, and swore he would shoot him. The company at that time used all their force, and crowded the officers, and their assistants some distance back, and carried off and secreted the prisoner. The officer and his company then went to the tavern to stay all night. The next morning about eight o’Clock the constable and Mr. Markham went to the grocery and searched, and Bartlett said that he was gone— that he had taken his horse and gone out of town. They then saw a company of men gathering at ’s store, armed with guns, bayonets, pistols, clubs and other missiles. Mr. Markham went to the store, where he found the constable and the prisoner. There were fifty, in and about [p. 1858]
9 January 1844 • Tuesday
January 9 Tuesday 9. At home.
I insert the following from the Neighbor, as a specimen of the respect which the mob has for law or justice:—
Disgraceful affair at .
On Tuesday last, , one of our officers went to for the purpose of arresting Milton Cook, on the charge of bastardy, and bringing him before , Justice of the Peace of this , before whom affidavit had been made to that effect. He found the accused in Bartlett’s grocery, () and arrested him. Cook had a gun that he said he had loaded for the purpose, and would make a hole through the if he molested him, and swore he would not be taken. and others, then stepped forward to his assistance, and said that they had sworn to stand by him, and that he should not go. He then returned with his process to the , and told him what had ocourred. Mr. then summoned eleven men to go along with the , and assist him in bringing the delinquent. They went out and drove to the grocery where they expected to find him, but he was not there; they then went out for a short time without making known their business, when they saw an armed force gathering. [HC 6:171]
They shortly afterwards returned to the grocery, and saw him there, where he swore he would not be taken— there was also an armed force standing in the door, who also swore he should not be taken. The officer having the process; Mr. Markham, and , stepped forward and wished to reason the case with them; the officer, at the same time demanding their assistance; they were met with an armed force of about twenty, four of whom stood in the doorway; two with guns and bayonets, and two with pistols. The two having the bayonets charged directly at Mr. Markham and swore they would run him through and rushed upon him with their bayonets. He however warded off their blows with his arm, and the bayonet glanced and struck Mr in the abdomen, the bayonet went through his clothes scratched his body, and glanced off without doing any further injury, other than giving him a slight cut in the hand. Those having the pistols then attempted to shoot, when Mr. Markham seized the hand of one of them that held the pistol, and prevented him from firing— The other put his pistol to ’s breast, and swore he would shoot him. The company at that time used all their force, and crowded the officers, and their assistants some distance back, and carried off and secreted the prisoner. The officer and his company then went to the tavern to stay all night. The next morning about eight o’Clock the constable and Mr. Markham went to the grocery and searched, and Bartlett said that he was gone— that he had taken his horse and gone out of town. They then saw a company of men gathering at ’s store, armed with guns, bayonets, pistols, clubs and other missiles. Mr. Markham went to the store, where he found the constable and the prisoner. There were fifty, in and about [p. 1858]
Page 1858