History, 1838–1856, volume E-1 [1 July 1843–30 April 1844]

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
Page 1753
image
<​October 11​> the Aztec or Toltec races in their migrations from the Northern regions of , may find in these ancient edifices many subjects of curious speculation.”
12 October 1843 • Thursday
<​12​> Thursday 12. Prayer meeting in my room. We prayed for , who was sick.
I sent to , to borrow $50 that I might be able to redeem $5.000 worth of property, which was published to be sold to day, at Rhodes’s, but refused: he also went to Eli Chase’s, but was also refused by him: I was grieved that the brethren felt so penurious in their Spirit, altho’ they profess<​ed​> to be guided by the [HC 6:54] revelations which the Lord gives through me. On my afterwards giving a pledge that I would repay the $50. in 48 hours lent the money and enabled me to redeem the land.
I received the following from :—
27th. Sepr. 1843 Rev. Jos Smith, Dear Sir— I see by the News-papers that there has been a meeting of citizens at relative to the Mormons, and that several severe resolutions have been passed condemning the conduct of the Mormons— knowing how little I can rely upon public rumor upon such subjects, I have taken the liberty of applying directly to you for correct information and solicit as a particular favor that you will communicate at your earliest convenience the facts in the case—
Of course I feel an interest in the prosperity of and an interest also in the success of the Mormon enterprize, and a deep interest in the welfare of your people, and the more so certainly, as their pecuniary interest is identified with my own— I make this frank acknowledgement because it is always best for men of sense to talk as they mean— I should however be solicitous for a successful termination of your great enterprize had I not one Dollar invested in , because the complete triumph of energetic exertions is always gratifying to all business men. Your obedt <​Servt​>, .”
Wrote this Reply:—
Ill Oct. 12, 1843. Dear Sir Your letter of the 27th. ult. is at hand, soliciting information concerning the resolutions.” In answer to your very candid inquiry and “interest” relative to our welfare, brevity will suffice. Unprincipled men and disappointed demagogues, with here and there an “untamed sucker,” composed that disgraceful and disgracing, as well as mobocratic assemblage; and I feel proud to say that patriots and honest men generally frown upon such audacious proceedings, as beneath the dignity of freemen. It is to be hoped that public opinion will continue to spurn at such doings, and leave the actors to fester in their own shame.
With the smiling prospects around us at present, success seems [HC 6:55] certain, and with the blessings of Jehovah, we shall reap the reward of virtue and goodness. I go for the good of the world, and if all honest men would do so, mean men would be scarce. You are at liberty to use this to counteract falsehoods, as you may deem proper. Respectfully, I am, your obt. Servt.
Joseph Smith.” [p. 1753]
October 11 the Aztec or Toltec races in their migrations from the Northern regions of , may find in these ancient edifices many subjects of curious speculation.”
12 October 1843 • Thursday
12 Thursday 12. Prayer meeting in my room. We prayed for , who was sick.
I sent to , to borrow $50 that I might be able to redeem $5.000 worth of property, which was published to be sold to day, at Rhodes’s, but refused: he also went to Eli Chase’s, but was refused by him: I was grieved that the brethren felt so penurious in their Spirit, altho’ they professed to be guided by the [HC 6:54] revelations which the Lord gives through me. On my afterwards giving a pledge that I would repay the $50. in 48 hours lent the money and enabled me to redeem the land.
I received the following from :—
27th. Sepr. 1843 Rev. Jos Smith, Dear Sir— I see by the News-papers that there has been a meeting of citizens at relative to the Mormons, and that several severe resolutions have been passed condemning the conduct of the Mormons— knowing how little I can rely upon public rumor upon such subjects, I have taken the liberty of applying directly to you for correct information and solicit as a particular favor that you will communicate at your earliest convenience the facts in the case—
Of course I feel an interest in the prosperity of and an interest also in the success of the Mormon enterprize, and a deep interest in the welfare of your people, and the more so certainly, as their pecuniary interest is identified with my own— I make this frank acknowledgement because it is always best for men of sense to talk as they mean— I should however be solicitous for a successful termination of your great enterprize had I not one Dollar invested in , because the complete triumph of energetic exertions is always gratifying to all business men. Your obedt Servt, .”
Wrote this Reply:—
Ill Oct. 12, 1843. Dear Sir Your letter of the 27th. ult. is at hand, soliciting information concerning the “ resolutions.” In answer to your very candid inquiry and “interest” relative to our welfare, brevity will suffice. Unprincipled men and disappointed demagogues, with here and there an “untamed sucker,” composed that disgraceful and disgracing, as well as mobocratic assemblage; and I feel proud to say that patriots and honest men generally frown upon such audacious proceedings, as beneath the dignity of freemen. It is to be hoped that public opinion will continue to spurn at such doings, and leave the actors to fester in their own shame.
With the smiling prospects around us at present, success seems [HC 6:55] certain, and with the blessings of Jehovah, we shall reap the reward of virtue and goodness. I go for the good of the world, and if all honest men would do so, mean men would be scarce. You are at liberty to use this to counteract falsehoods, as you may deem proper. Respectfully, I am, your obt. Servt.
Joseph Smith.” [p. 1753]
Page 1753