History, 1838–1856, volume E-1 [1 July 1843–30 April 1844]

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
Page 1875
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<​February 2.​> only went into my knees, and finally could tread on the top of the water and went almost with the speed of an arrow. I said to see how swift I can go: I thought it was great sport and pleasure to travel with such speed, and I awoke.”
3 February 1844 • Saturday
<​3.​> Saturday 3. Prayer meeting in the Assembly room.
The High Council met, did but little business.
A rather favorable article appears in Niles’ National Register of this date, noticing the correspondence between myself and , a copy of which is contained in the political department of the same number. It also notices the correspondence between myself and publishing the same, with some of our city ordinances. The Editor also quotes the following from the “Hawk Eye”;— ,’
“Although much complaint has been made about the Mormons, we saw on our late trip evidences of improvement on our prairies, which we consider highly creditable to the Mormons who made them, and without whom we doubt whether they would have been made for many years to come. All those who have travelled over the large prairie between Fort Madison, , and , remember how dreary it was a few [HC 6:195] years since. Now it is studded with houses and good farms. The English who understand hedging and ditching far better than our people, have gone upon that prairie and have enclosed extensive fields in this manner. Along the old Rock Island trace, which we travelled seven years ago and which was then a dreary waste, we saw a field enclosed with a good sod fence, six miles long and one wide. We think such enterprize is worthy to be mentioned. As long as the Mormons are harmless and do not interfere with the rights of our people, we think they should be treated well. We shall never convince them that they are a deluded people, as far as their religious notions are concerned, in any other way.”
4 February 1844 • Sunday
<​4.​> Sunday 4. I attended prayer meeting with the Quorum in the Assembly room, and made some remarks respecting the hundred and forty four thousand mentioned by John the Revelator shewing that the selection of persons to form that number had already commenced.
Prest. held a meeting at Bro: Chamberlain’s in the neighborhood North of the , and Elder , at Thomas Kington’s six miles East of the .
5 February 1844 • Monday
<​5​> Monday 5. The regular Session of the Municipal court was opened in the Mayor’s ; present , , and . Adjourned to the on account of the severity of the weather. I presided as Chief Justice: the assessors of the different Wards in the presented their tax lists, which occupied nearly all day. The Court remitted the Taxes of the Widows, and of the poor who were unable to pay.
In the afternoon Elder —— (whom I had employed as Architect of the ) <​came in​> for instructions. I instructed him in relation to the circular windows, designed to light the offices, in the dead work of the arch between stories— he said that round windows in the broad side of a building was <​were​> a violation of all the known rules of architecture, and contended they should [p. 1875]
February 2. only went into my knees, and finally could tread on the top of the water and went almost with the speed of an arrow. I said to see how swift I can go: I thought it was great sport and pleasure to travel with such speed, and I awoke.”
3 February 1844 • Saturday
3. Saturday 3. Prayer meeting in the Assembly room.
The High Council met, did but little business.
A rather favorable article appears in Niles’ National Register of this date, noticing the correspondence between myself and , a copy of which is contained in the political department of the same number. It also notices the correspondence between myself and publishing the same, with some of our city ordinances. The Editor also quotes the following from the “Hawk Eye”;— ,’
“Although much complaint has been made about the Mormons, we saw on our late trip evidences of improvement on our prairies, which we consider highly creditable to the Mormons who made them, and without whom we doubt whether they would have been made for many years to come. All those who have travelled over the large prairie between Fort Madison, , and , remember how dreary it was a few [HC 6:195] years since. Now it is studded with houses and good farms. The English who understand hedging and ditching far better than our people, have gone upon that prairie and have enclosed extensive fields in this manner. Along the old Rock Island trace, which we travelled seven years ago and which was then a dreary waste, we saw a field enclosed with a good sod fence, six miles long and one wide. We think such enterprize is worthy to be mentioned. As long as the Mormons are harmless and do not interfere with the rights of our people, we think they should be treated well. We shall never convince them that they are a deluded people, as far as their religious notions are concerned, in any other way.”
4 February 1844 • Sunday
4. Sunday 4. I attended prayer meeting with the Quorum in the Assembly room, and made some remarks respecting the hundred and forty four thousand mentioned by John the Revelator shewing that the selection of persons to form that number had already commenced.
Prest. held a meeting at Bro: Chamberlain’s in the neighborhood North of the , and Elder , at Thomas Kington’s six miles East of the .
5 February 1844 • Monday
5 Monday 5. The regular Session of the Municipal court was opened in the Mayor’s ; present , , and . Adjourned to the on account of the severity of the weather. I presided as Chief Justice: the assessors of the different Wards in the presented their tax lists, which occupied nearly all day. The Court remitted the Taxes of the Widows, and of the poor who were unable to pay.
In the afternoon Elder —— (whom I had employed as Architect of the ) came in for instructions. I instructed him in relation to the circular windows, designed to light the offices, in the dead work of the arch between stories— he said that round windows in the broad side of a building were a violation of all the known rules of architecture, and contended they should [p. 1875]
Page 1875