History, 1838–1856, volume E-1 [1 July 1843–30 April 1844]

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
Page 1799
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<​December 9​> on the subject of the organization of the Legion, he being of the opinion that said Legion was disconnected from the military communities of the whole , and in no way subject to the regular military officers, professing an exexemption, even from subjection to the general military laws, with a law making power vested in their own Legion.
After some pertinent remarks by , General Joseph Smith briefly addressed the meeting; he dissented entirely from the opinion of the , and observed that it was stated in the charter that the Legion was a part of the militia of , and that his commission declared that he (General Smith) was the Lieutenant General of the Legion, and of the Militia of the State of , and as such, it was not only his duty to enforce the city ordinances, but the laws of the when called on by the Governor. He also stated that he had been informed that the of had it in [HC 6:107] contemplation to make another requisition on the of for him. (Joseph Smith.)
The meeting then adjourned sine die.
Sec. Chairman.
Received the following
Legion City Dec 9th. 1843 Lieut. Genl. Joseph Smith. In consequence of the orders I received from you
“To hold in readiness a sufficient portion of the Legion &c.” To make said forces efficient it will be necessary to supply them with munitions of war, which of course must be done at the expense of the , you will therefore please to give orders to the commandments of cohorts on their application to you on the city Treasury for whatever amount you may think proper on the present occasion
most Respectfully your obedt. Servt. , Major Genl. N. L.”
10 December 1843 • Sunday
<​10​> Sunday 10. Rainy day. I staid at home.
A prayer meeting <​held this​> evening in the Assembly Room I was not present. presided; several sick person were prayed for.
By letter from J. White, deputy Sheriff of Clark County, Missouri, I learn that Mr. is in Marion County prison, without trial the Sheriff requests several men to go there as Witnesses, it is evidently a trap to get some more of our people into their power, when I was in prison in , my Witnesses were arrested before they got into Court to testify, except one, who was kicked out of the court by an officer Lieutt. Cook who dam’d him and ordered some of his company to shoot him, after which the turned to me tauntingly saying “why the hell don’t you bring on your Witnesses” and laughed at my discomfiture. The Saints have had enough of mob justice. [HC 6:108]
11 December 1843 • Monday
<​11​> Monday 11 The following affidavit will shew that some of the citizens of are so far fallen, and so much governed by mobocratic influence as to assist the wretches in their hellish designs:
State of )
)
On the 11th. day of December 1843, came , before me , a justice of the peace of said , and after being duly sworn deposeth and saith that the crime of kidnapping has been committed in , and [p. 1799]
December 9 on the subject of the organization of the Legion, he being of the opinion that said Legion was disconnected from the military communities of the whole , and in no way subject to the regular military officers, professing an exexemption, even from subjection to the general military laws, with a law making power vested in their own Legion.
After some pertinent remarks by , General Joseph Smith briefly addressed the meeting; he dissented entirely from the opinion of the , and observed that it was stated in the charter that the Legion was a part of the militia of , and that his commission declared that he (General Smith) was the Lieutenant General of the Legion, and of the Militia of the State of , and as such, it was not only his duty to enforce the city ordinances, but the laws of the when called on by the Governor. He also stated that he had been informed that the of had it in [HC 6:107] contemplation to make another requisition on the of for him. (Joseph Smith.)
The meeting then adjourned sine die.
Sec. Chairman.
Received the following
Legion City Dec 9th. 1843 Lieut. Genl. Joseph Smith. In consequence of the orders I received from you
“To hold in readiness a sufficient portion of the Legion &c.” To make said forces efficient it will be necessary to supply them with munitions of war, which of course must be done at the expense of the , you will therefore please to give orders to the commandments of cohorts on their application to you on the city Treasury for whatever amount you may think proper on the present occasion
most Respectfully your obedt. Servt. , Major Genl. N. L.”
10 December 1843 • Sunday
10 Sunday 10. Rainy day. I staid at home.
A prayer meeting held this evening in the Assembly Room I was not present. presided; several sick person were prayed for.
By letter from J. White, deputy Sheriff of Clark County, Missouri, I learn that Mr. is in Marion County prison, without trial the Sheriff requests several men to go there as Witnesses, it is evidently a trap to get some more of our people into their power, when I was in prison in , my Witnesses were arrested before they got into Court to testify, except one, who was kicked out of the court by an officer Lieutt. Cook who dam’d him and ordered some of his company to shoot him, after which the turned to me tauntingly saying “why the hell don’t you bring on your Witnesses” and laughed at my discomfiture. The Saints have had enough of mob justice. [HC 6:108]
11 December 1843 • Monday
11 Monday 11 The following affidavit will shew that some of the citizens of are so far fallen, and so much governed by mobocratic influence as to assist the wretches in their hellish designs:
State of )
)
On the 11th. day of December 1843, came , before me , a justice of the peace of said , and after being duly sworn deposeth and saith that the crime of kidnapping has been committed in , and [p. 1799]
Page 1799