History, 1838–1856, volume E-1 [1 July 1843–30 April 1844]

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
Page 1733
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<​September 11​> when the old Shepherd of the sheep comes up to lick Salt, the Elders will hit him over the head with a cane; their religion is as dear to them as ours to us. Don’t feed too much Salt at once, but give a little at a time or they are cloyed.
Elders of Israel, be wise; give short discourses, as long ones cloy your hearers, who will say ‘a good discourse, but I got tired.’
Never infringe on the rights of other people, and never tear down other people’s houses till you have built a better. We are sent to preach repentance, and let people alone. How do you like to go into other Churches, and hear them abusing us? Do as you would be done by; persuade men and not compel them unless the time spoken off by the Savior comes when the Lord shall say unto his servants “go out into the high ways and hedges and compel them to come in, that my house may be filled’ Luke 14 ch. 23 v. Let men be humble, kind, and affectionate.” [HC 6:30]
10 September 1843 • Sunday • Second of Two Entries
<​10.​> Sunday 10. Cold and considerable rain: kindled a fire in the for the first time this fall. This is the first rain of any consequence since the first of June; there has been occasional— say three or four slight showers, but not enough to wet the potato hills, and the vegetables in the gardens have generally stopped growing on account of the drouth;— even corn is seriously injured,— much of it by a worm in the ear. Early potatoes are scarcely worth digging.
11 September 1843 • Monday • Second of Two Entries
<​11.​> Monday 11. Early this morning a petition was presented to me, as Lieutt. General, to devise means to get the public arms of the State for the Legion: Whereupon I appointed , , and , a Committee to wait on on the subject.
Election for Probate Justice— weather cold— people cold. received most of the votes in ,— say 700 votes.
6 p.m. I met with my brother , , and , in my private room, where we had a season of prayer for ’s little daughter who was sick, and who was some better.
12 September 1843 • Tuesday
<​12.​> Tuesday 12. Rainy day. [HC 6:31]
left for Portland by Railroad, and while passing through Chester woods, the Engine was thrown off the tracks, and with the Baggage cars, smashed to pieces, several of the passenger trains mounted the ruins, but none of the passengers were injured except two very slightly. The Engineer however was killed instantaneously. with most of the passengers remained all night in the woods, and found it very cold.
13 September 1843 • Wednesday
<​13.​> Wednesday 13. I attended a lecture at the by Mr. John Finch, a Socialist from , and said a few words in reply.
The following article appears in the Neighbor, copied from “The (Conn) Herald.”
and Joseph Smith. A gentlemen of this town, of undoubted veracity, who has lately spent several weeks at , and among the Mormons, informs us that the general impression abroad in [p. 1733]
September 11 when the old Shepherd of the sheep comes up to lick Salt, the Elders will hit him over the head with a cane; their religion is as dear to them as ours to us. Don’t feed too much Salt at once, but give a little at a time or they are cloyed.
Elders of Israel, be wise; give short discourses, as long ones cloy your hearers, who will say ‘a good discourse, but I got tired.’
Never infringe on the rights of other people, and never tear down other people’s houses till you have built a better. We are sent to preach repentance, and let people alone. How do you like to go into other Churches, and hear them abusing us? Do as you would be done by; persuade men and not compel them unless the time spoken off by the Savior comes when the Lord shall say unto his servants “go out into the high ways and hedges and compel them to come in, that my house may be filled’ Luke 14 ch. 23 v. Let men be humble, kind, and affectionate.” [HC 6:30]
10 September 1843 • Sunday • Second of Two Entries
10. Sunday 10. Cold and considerable rain: kindled a fire in the for the first time this fall. This is the first rain of any consequence since the first of June; there has been occasional— say three or four slight showers, but not enough to wet the potato hills, and the vegetables in the gardens have generally stopped growing on account of the drouth;— even corn is seriously injured,— much of it by a worm in the ear. Early potatoes are scarcely worth digging.
11 September 1843 • Monday • Second of Two Entries
11. Monday 11. Early this morning a petition was presented to me, as Lieutt. General, to devise means to get the public arms of the State for the Legion: Whereupon I appointed , , and , a Committee to wait on on the subject.
Election for Probate Justice— weather cold— people cold. received most of the votes in ,— say 700 votes.
6 p.m. I met with my brother , , and , in my private room, where we had a season of prayer for ’s little daughter who was sick, and who was some better.
12 September 1843 • Tuesday
12. Tuesday 12. Rainy day. [HC 6:31]
left for Portland by Railroad, and while passing through Chester woods, the Engine was thrown off the tracks, and with the Baggage cars, smashed to pieces, several of the passenger trains mounted the ruins, but none of the passengers were injured except two very slightly. The Engineer however was killed instantaneously. with most of the passengers remained all night in the woods, and found it very cold.
13 September 1843 • Wednesday
13. Wednesday 13. I attended a lecture at the by Mr. John Finch, a Socialist from , and said a few words in reply.
The following article appears in the Neighbor, copied from “The (Conn) Herald.”
and Joseph Smith. A gentlemen of this town, of undoubted veracity, who has lately spent several weeks at , and among the Mormons, informs us that the general impression abroad in [p. 1733]
Page 1733