History, 1838–1856, volume E-1 [1 July 1843–30 April 1844]

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
Page 1709
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<​August 27​> said:
“I never saw but three times, and never exchanged a word with any man living on the subject. I ask pardon for having done anything which should give occasion to make you think so.”
In the evening attended Council and prayer meeting with my brother , , , and .
28 August 1843 • Monday
<​28​> Monday 28. I was visited by a deputation of Pottowatamie Indians; the following is copy of a letter brought by them
“Father,
The last time we been in her we dint understand what you have tel us, this day the berrer will let us know what advise your goo[d]ness will let us know the last time we saw the Real (Red) french they use two tel us how to do always we are like bline peple in this place, we want know what is the matter they want allways our land then if wel do so how will com of us— You are our father we hope you tell us faier and throuth of all this business one, the french and Anglis as allways make charitey we hope you will be the same. our chiffe are very onsisay [anxious] for that matter to per asap [perhaps] let go our land— we allways think to not let led go. Your advise father is what we want, when I was a boy I never think to lost our land but now I am fare from my father— I am bline— But still we attend to not sel or Exchange no we shut our yeres [eyes] to our frends ar on Mission and opened— tow you— Miamis Nahachaweth, Mesaocobet, Megesse, Chabortoche, this are grate menes not chiefs but considerate, we think after you saw this lines father you will let us know by your hand what you think— if your think we must kepe our land your are with us we, chant give up— if you say so— we are all against the [blank] other Band, and Brave fellers in here— Namouth, Manitomenque, Paicouchaiby, Tapawisse, we hierd cled our father was arive now we begin to see lite, <​then we send our Soldiers two give there hands & ours to our father we like very much you shall be our father we think Grate of you we think as longe we are in the Dark our father will give us the Lite​> the last time our Soldiers went to sea you we could not understand good but know we send our will understand well and repeted well what you will tel us, we like veray much to give us some plant (plan) of our land where is bigin— Paicouchaiby like his knew father if he will be let us know, we give our hand tow Father and hope all good ad vises from him.
We go Give our hand to our father, brave soldier,— and younges menes and hope your advise by your hand,
<​Prairy, Indian Band​>
we are very Pour it is for that we pray on you father—”
To the foregoing I wrote this answer
August 28. 1843 Dear children, I have received and read your kind words, and agreeable to your wishes I now send you an answer. In regard to parting with your lands and selling them, I do not think it is best for you to let them go but to keep them to live upon for yourselves and your children, and in regard to my giving you council and being your father I have to say that I shall be happy to render you any assistance in my power in giving instructions and advice as well as to do any other business for you, which lays in my power at any time if it be not contrary to the laws of the , which laws I am always obedient and subject to. I feel interested in the welfare and prosperity of all [p. 1709]
August 27 said:
“I never saw but three times, and never exchanged a word with any man living on the subject. I ask pardon for having done anything which should give occasion to make you think so.”
In the evening attended Council and prayer meeting with my brother , , , and .
28 August 1843 • Monday
28 Monday 28. I was visited by a deputation of Pottowatamie Indians; the following is copy of a letter brought by them
“Father,
The last time we been in her we dint understand what you have tel us, this day the berrer will let us know what advise your goodness will let us know the last time we saw the Real (Red) french they use two tel us how to do always we are like bline peple in this place, we want know what is the matter they want allways our land then if wel do so how will com of us— You are our father we hope you tell us faier and throuth of all this business one, the french and Anglis as allways make charitey we hope you will be the same. our chiffe are very onsisay [anxious] for that matter to per asap [perhaps] let go our land— we allways think to not let led go. Your advise father is what we want, when I was a boy I never think to lost our land but now I am fare from my father— I am bline— But still we attend to not sel or Exchange no we shut our yeres [eyes] to our frends ar on Mission and opened— tow you— Miamis Nahachaweth, Mesaocobet, Megesse, Chabortoche, this are grate menes not chiefs but considerate, we think after you saw this lines father you will let us know by your hand what you think— if your think we must kepe our land your are with us we, chant give up— if you say so— we are all against the [blank] other Band, and Brave fellers in here— Namouth, Manitomenque, Paicouchaiby, Tapawisse, we hierd cled our father was arive now we begin to see lite, then we send our Soldiers two give there hands & ours to our father we like very much you shall be our father we think Grate of you we think as longe we are in the Dark our father will give us the Lite the last time our Soldiers went to sea you we could not understand good but know we send our will understand well and repeted well what you will tel us, we like veray much to give us some plant (plan) of our land where is bigin— Paicouchaiby like his knew father if he will be let us know, we give our hand tow Father and hope all good ad vises from him.
We go Give our hand to our father, brave soldier,— and younges menes and hope your advise by your hand,
Prairy, Indian Band
we are very Pour it is for that we pray on you father—”
To the foregoing I wrote this answer
August 28. 1843 Dear children, I have received and read your kind words, and agreeable to your wishes I now send you an answer. In regard to parting with your lands and selling them, I do not think it is best for you to let them go but to keep them to live upon for yourselves and your children, and in regard to my giving you council and being your father I have to say that I shall be happy to render you any assistance in my power in giving instructions and advice as well as to do any other business for you, which lays in my power at any time if it be not contrary to the laws of the , which laws I am always obedient and subject to. I feel interested in the welfare and prosperity of all [p. 1709]
Page 1709