History, 1838–1856, volume E-1 [1 July 1843–30 April 1844]

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
Page 1886
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<​February 7.​> to have their prayers granted: and give liberty to the captive; by paying the southern gentlemen gentleman a reasonable equivalent for his property, that the whole nation might be free indeed! When the people petitioned for a national bank, I would use my best endeavors to have their prayers granted <​answered​>; and answered <​establish​> one on national principles to save taxes, and make them the controllers of its ways and means; and when the people petitioned to possess the territory of or any other contiguous territory: I would lend the influence of a chief magistrate to grant so reasonable a request, that they might extend the mighty efforts and enterprize of a free people from the East to the West sea; and make the wilderness blossom as the rose; and when a neighboring realm petitioned to join the union of the sons of liberty, my voice would be, come: yea come : come Mexico: come ; and come all the world— let us be brethren; let us be one great family; and let there be a universal peace. Abolish the cruel custom of prisons, (except certain cases,) penitentiaries,—— court-martials for desertion; and let reason and friendship reign over the ruins of ignorance and barbarity: yea I would, as the universal friend of man, open the prisons; open the eyes; open the ears and open the hearts of the all [HC 6:208] people, to behold and enjoy freedom, unadulterated freedom: and God, who once cleansed the violence of the earth with a flood; whose Son laid down his life for the salvation of all his father gave him out of the world; and who has promised that he will come and purify the world again with fire in the last days, should be supplicated by me for the good of all people.
With the highest esteem, I am a friend of virtue, and of the people.
Joseph Smith.
, Illinois, February 7. 1844. [HC 6:209]
<​* -[Last paragraph of the 8th. to come in here on the 7th]-​>
8 February 1844 • Thursday
<​8.​> Thursday 8. Held Mayor’s court, and tried two negroes for attempting to marry white women; fined one $25. and the other $5. In the evening there was a political meeting in the Assembly room, when publicly read for the first time, my “views of the powers and policy of the General Government.” I addressed the meeting as follows:—
“I would not have suffered my name to have been used by my friends on any wise, as president of the , or Candidate for that office, if I and my friends could have had the privilege of enjoying our religious and civil rights as American citizens, even those rights which the Constitution guaranteed guarantees unto all her citizens alike, but this we as a people have been denied from the beginning. Persecution has rolled upon our heads from time to time, from portions of the , like peals of thunder, because of our religion, and no portion of the government as yet has stepped forward for our relief; and under view of these things, I feel it to be my right and privilege to obtain what influence and power I can lawfully in the for the [HC 6:210] protection of injured innocence, and if I loose my life in a good cause I am willing to be sacrificed on the alter of virtue, righteousness and truth, in maintaining the laws and constitution of the if need be for the general good of mankind.”
I was followed by Elders and , and a unaminous [p. 1886]
February 7. to have their prayers granted: and give liberty to the captive; by paying the southern gentleman a reasonable equivalent for his property, that the whole nation might be free indeed! When the people petitioned for a national bank, I would use my best endeavors to have their prayers answered; and establish one on national principles to save taxes, and make them the controllers of its ways and means; and when the people petitioned to possess the territory of or any other contiguous territory: I would lend the influence of a chief magistrate to grant so reasonable a request, that they might extend the mighty efforts and enterprize of a free people from the East to the West sea; and make the wilderness blossom as the rose; and when a neighboring realm petitioned to join the union of the sons of liberty, my voice would be, come: yea come : come Mexico: come ; and come all the world— let us be brethren; let us be one great family; and let there be a universal peace. Abolish the cruel custom of prisons, (except certain cases,) penitentiaries,—— court-martials for desertion; and let reason and friendship reign over the ruins of ignorance and barbarity: yea I would, as the universal friend of man, open the prisons; open the eyes; open the ears and open the hearts of all [HC 6:208] people, to behold and enjoy freedom, unadulterated freedom: and God, who once cleansed the violence of the earth with a flood; whose Son laid down his life for the salvation of all his father gave him out of the world; and who has promised that he will come and purify the world again with fire in the last days, should be supplicated by me for the good of all people.
With the highest esteem, I am a friend of virtue, and of the people.
Joseph Smith.
, Illinois, February 7. 1844. [HC 6:209]
* -[Last paragraph of the 8th. to come in here on the 7th]-
8 February 1844 • Thursday
8. Thursday 8. Held Mayor’s court, and tried two negroes for attempting to marry white women; fined one $25. and the other $5. In the evening there was a political meeting in the Assembly room, when publicly read for the first time, my “views of the powers and policy of the General Government.” I addressed the meeting as follows:—
“I would not have suffered my name to have been used by my friends on any wise, as president of the , or Candidate for that office, if I and my friends could have had the privilege of enjoying our religious and civil rights as American citizens, even those rights which the Constitution guarantees unto all her citizens alike, but this we as a people have been denied from the beginning. Persecution has rolled upon our heads from time to time, from portions of the , like peals of thunder, because of our religion, and no portion of the government as yet has stepped forward for our relief; and under view of these things, I feel it to be my right and privilege to obtain what influence and power I can lawfully in the for the [HC 6:210] protection of injured innocence, and if I loose my life in a good cause I am willing to be sacrificed on the alter of virtue, righteousness and truth, in maintaining the laws and constitution of the if need be for the general good of mankind.”
I was followed by Elders and , and a unaminous [p. 1886]
Page 1886