History, 1838–1856, volume E-1 [1 July 1843–30 April 1844]

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
Page 1659
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<​July 3​> at the Public house of Captain William Haws (the Captain of a company in which served in the Black Hawk war,) we again resumed the march and about dark <​camped about two miles below Ottawa, near the ​> having travelled over 200 miles in 2 days and 18 hours with the same horses, which had become very tired, [blank] . left the company about an hour before sun set and about dusk crossed the into Ottawa and put up at brother Sangers. There he learned positively that Joseph had come as far as Pawpaw Grove, where he was informed that Judge Caton was absent, and had returned to and obtained another writ of Habeas Corpus, and had started in the direction of , Adams County, and also that Lucien P Sanger had taken his Stage coach to convey brother Joseph to , when he had obtained this information, he left orders for the Maid of Iowa to return with all speed to .
Early on the morning of the 29th. returned to his Company and gave them the information, when the Company started on their return for , came as far as Captain Haws’s and staid all night; he gave us the use of his barn to sleep in; in conversing with the citizens of Magnolia they approbated our course, manifested a warm feeling, and offered to help us with <​their​> artillery Company, if we needed their assistance.
On the 30th. we made a direct course for the Narrows 4 miles above Peoria, where we recrossed the , and camped near the Town.
1st. July. we travelled 40 miles and camped on a small creek near a Farm house where the entire Company had an abundance of milk for the night.
2nd. July <​Early in the morning Jesse B. Nichols went into the village of <​Gallsburg​>, waked up a blacksmith, and employed him to set a couple of horse shoes. The blacksmith objected saying it was Sunday morning, and being a professor of religion, he would not do it, unless for double price which Nichols consented to give him. He went to the Shop, and whilst setting the shoes, the Company passed through, exciting considerable curiosity among the Villagers—— two of the brethren remained to accompany Nichols: as he was about paying the Blacksmith for the work, a Presbyterian Minister came up and said to him “you ought to charge a dollar a shoe, these are Mormons, and you who are a Church Member have been shoeing this Mormon’s horse on [HC 5:487] Sunday, and you ought to be brought before the Church for doing it”. Upon which the blacksmith demanded two dollars for his work, instead of one as agreed, before. Nichols handed him one dollar, the Priest telling the Blacksmith he ought not to take it, that Jo Smith was an Imposter and ought to be hung. The Son of Vulcan however took the dollar but demanded more. Upon which Nichols kicked the Priest on his seat of honor, mounted his horse, and left amid the loud cheers of a number of Spectators.​> We continued our journey to , where we learnt the full particulars of brother Joseph’s safe arrival and trial before the Municipal court, when we made merry, composed a song, and danced, and proceeded to
During the entire journey the heat was extremely oppressive, and as the necessity of the case was very urgent they <​we​> had not time to sleep, it may be safely said to be one of the most rapid and fatiguing marches that is on record having travelled with the same horses about 500 miles in 7 days.”
Another copy of the remonstrance to the against his sending an armed force, was made out and taken to the Porch of the where it was signed in the course of the day by about 900 persons.
4 July 1843 • Tuesday
<​4​> About 1 a.m. Messrs. , , , and , started for , carrying with them the affidavits, Petition, and the doings of the Municipal court.
At a very early hour people began to assemble at the , and at 11 o’Clock near 13,000 persons had congregated, and were addressed in a very able and appropriate manner by Elder , who has recently been appointed on a Mission to St. Petersburg, Russia. A constant accession of numbers swelled the congregation to 15,000 as near as could be estimated. [blank] at 2 p.m. they were again addressed by Elder on redemption, in a masterly discourse, when I made some remarks of which the following was reported by Elder . [HC 5:488]
“If the people will give ear a moment I will address them, with a [p. 1659]
July 3 at the Public house of Captain William Haws (the Captain of a company in which served in the Black Hawk war,) we again resumed the march and about dark camped about two miles below Ottawa, near the having travelled over 200 miles in 2 days and 18 hours with the same horses, which had become very tired, [blank] . left the company about an hour before sun set and about dusk crossed the into Ottawa and put up at brother Sangers. There he learned positively that Joseph had come as far as Pawpaw Grove, where he was informed that Judge Caton was absent, and had returned to and obtained another writ of Habeas Corpus, and had started in the direction of , Adams County, and also that Lucien P Sanger had taken his Stage coach to convey brother Joseph to , when he had obtained this information, he left orders for the Maid of Iowa to return with all speed to .
Early on the morning of the 29th. returned to his Company and gave them the information, when the Company started on their return for , came as far as Captain Haws’s and staid all night; he gave us the use of his barn to sleep in; in conversing with the citizens of Magnolia they approbated our course, manifested a warm feeling, and offered to help us with their artillery Company, if we needed their assistance.
On the 30th. we made a direct course for the Narrows 4 miles above Peoria, where we recrossed the , and camped near the Town.
1st. July. we travelled 40 miles and camped on a small creek near a Farm house where the entire Company had an abundance of milk for the night.
2nd. July Early in the morning Jesse B. Nichols went into the village of Gallsburg, waked up a blacksmith, and employed him to set a couple of horse shoes. The blacksmith objected saying it was Sunday morning, and being a professor of religion, he would not do it, unless for double price which Nichols consented to give him. He went to the Shop, and whilst setting the shoes, the Company passed through, exciting considerable curiosity among the Villagers—— two of the brethren remained to accompany Nichols: as he was about paying the Blacksmith for the work, a Presbyterian Minister came up and said to him “you ought to charge a dollar a shoe, these are Mormons, and you who are a Church Member have been shoeing this Mormon’s horse on [HC 5:487] Sunday, and you ought to be brought before the Church for doing it”. Upon which the blacksmith demanded two dollars for his work, instead of one as agreed, before. Nichols handed him one dollar, the Priest telling the Blacksmith he ought not to take it, that Jo Smith was an Imposter and ought to be hung. The Son of Vulcan however took the dollar but demanded more. Upon which Nichols kicked the Priest on his seat of honor, mounted his horse, and left amid the loud cheers of a number of Spectators. We continued our journey to , where we learnt the full particulars of brother Joseph’s safe arrival and trial before the Municipal court, when we made merry, composed a song, and danced, and proceeded to
During the entire journey the heat was extremely oppressive, and as the necessity of the case was very urgent we had not time to sleep, it may be safely said to be one of the most rapid and fatiguing marches that is on record having travelled with the same horses about 500 miles in 7 days.”
Another copy of the remonstrance to the against his sending an armed force, was made out and taken to the Porch of the where it was signed in the course of the day by about 900 persons.
4 July 1843 • Tuesday
4 About 1 a.m. Messrs. , , , and , started for , carrying with them the affidavits, Petition, and the doings of the Municipal court.
At a very early hour people began to assemble at the , and at 11 o’Clock near 13,000 persons had congregated, and were addressed in a very able and appropriate manner by Elder , who has recently been appointed on a Mission to St. Petersburg, Russia. A constant accession of numbers swelled the congregation to 15,000 as near as could be estimated. [blank] at 2 p.m. they were again addressed by Elder on redemption, in a masterly discourse, when I made some remarks of which the following was reported by Elder . [HC 5:488]
“If the people will give ear a moment I will address them, with a [p. 1659]
Page 1659