History, 1838–1856, volume E-1 [1 July 1843–30 April 1844]

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
Page 1899
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<​February 27.​> In the afternoon visited the .
Mailed my views of the powers and policy &c. to the [HC 6:225] and Cabinet, Supreme Judges, Senators, Representatives, principal newspapers in the , (all the German), and many postmasters and individuals.
Almon L. Fullmer and volunteered to go on the Western exploring expedition.
28 February 1844 • Wednesday
<​28​> Wednesday 28. At home, Rainy day.
At 4 p. m. Steamboat Gen. Brooke passed up the , first boat this season. No ice in sight.
In the evening I sent to to call the brethren and pray for ’s sick child as he thought it could not live till morning. Elder and others, prayed for him.
Dr. Alphonzo [Alphonso] Young published an appeal to his native State of Tennessee giving a history of our troubles, and asking the influence of that State to obtain redress.
The Neighbor of to day publishes the following.
“For President, Joseph Smith.
Having now raised the name of our General and Prophet to the head of our columns, it becomes us, as Latter Day Saints, to be wise, prudent and energetic, in the cause that we pursue; and not to let any secondary influences control our minds, or govern our proceedings. The step that we have taken is a bold one, and requires our united efforts, perseverance, and diligence: but important as it may be, it is no greater than others have taken, and they have conceived that they had a right, without molestation to pursue that course, and to vote for that man whose election, they in their wisdom, thought would be most conducive to the public weal. As American citizens, then, we presume that all will concede to us this right: and whatever may be their views respecting the policy of such a step, they will acknowledge that we act legally, justly, and constitutionally in pursuing our present course. Some have nominated , some Col. [Richard M.] Johnson, others , others , and others . Those several committees unquestionably thought that they had each of them made the wisest selection, in naming the man of their choice: they selected their several candidates, because they thought that they were the wisest, the greatest statesmen, and the most competent to [HC 6:226] fill the Presidential Chair, whilst they severally thought that the other candidates were incompetent.— We have been governed by the same principles; and if others think they have made the wisest selection: so do we; if others think they have nominated the greatest statesmen, so do we; and while those several committees think that none of the nominations made are so good as their own: we think that the man of our choice is the most able, the most competent, the best qualified, and would fill the Presidential Chair with greater dignity to the nation and that his election would be conducive— of more happiness and prosperity at home and abroad, than that of any other man in these .
This is a thing that we, as Latter Day Saints know, and it now devolves upon us, as an imperative duty, to make others acquainted with the same things; and to use all our influence at home, and abroad, for the accomplishment of [p. 1899]
February 27. In the afternoon visited the .
Mailed my views of the powers and policy &c. to the [HC 6:225] and Cabinet, Supreme Judges, Senators, Representatives, principal newspapers in the , (all the German), and many postmasters and individuals.
Almon L. Fullmer and volunteered to go on the Western exploring expedition.
28 February 1844 • Wednesday
28 Wednesday 28. At home, Rainy day.
At 4 p. m. Steamboat Gen. Brooke passed up the , first boat this season. No ice in sight.
In the evening I sent to to call the brethren and pray for ’s sick child as he thought it could not live till morning. Elder and others, prayed for him.
Dr. Alphonzo [Alphonso] Young published an appeal to his native State of Tennessee giving a history of our troubles, and asking the influence of that State to obtain redress.
The Neighbor of to day publishes the following.
“For President, Joseph Smith.
Having now raised the name of our General and Prophet to the head of our columns, it becomes us, as Latter Day Saints, to be wise, prudent and energetic, in the cause that we pursue; and not to let any secondary influences control our minds, or govern our proceedings. The step that we have taken is a bold one, and requires our united efforts, perseverance, and diligence: but important as it may be, it is no greater than others have taken, and they have conceived that they had a right, without molestation to pursue that course, and to vote for that man whose election, they in their wisdom, thought would be most conducive to the public weal. As American citizens, then, we presume that all will concede to us this right: and whatever may be their views respecting the policy of such a step, they will acknowledge that we act legally, justly, and constitutionally in pursuing our present course. Some have nominated , some Col. Richard M. Johnson, others , others , and others . Those several committees unquestionably thought that they had each of them made the wisest selection, in naming the man of their choice: they selected their several candidates, because they thought that they were the wisest, the greatest statesmen, and the most competent to [HC 6:226] fill the Presidential Chair, whilst they severally thought that the other candidates were incompetent.— We have been governed by the same principles; and if others think they have made the wisest selection: so do we; if others think they have nominated the greatest statesmen, so do we; and while those several committees think that none of the nominations made are so good as their own: we think that the man of our choice is the most able, the most competent, the best qualified, and would fill the Presidential Chair with greater dignity to the nation and that his election would be conducive— of more happiness and prosperity at home and abroad, than that of any other man in these .
This is a thing that we, as Latter Day Saints know, and it now devolves upon us, as an imperative duty, to make others acquainted with the same things; and to use all our influence at home, and abroad, for the accomplishment of [p. 1899]
Page 1899