History, 1838–1856, volume E-1 [1 July 1843–30 April 1844]

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
Page 1773
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11 November 1843 • Saturday
<​November 11​> Saturday A company of Saints arrived from — the work is still prospering in that country, poverty and distress are making rapid strides, and the situation of the laboring classes is getting every day more deplorable.
City Council met. President, pro tem— appointed , Assessor and Collector for 1st. Ward. Daniel Hendricks for 2nd. Ward— 3rd. Ward, and for 4th. Ward.
12 November 1843 • Sunday
<​12​> Sunday 12 Prayer meeting in the evening in the South East room of my old house.
clear, cold.
13 November 1843 • Monday
<​13​> Monday 13 Having received a letter from Esq. I copy it.
, Oct. 24, 1843. Dear General,— I am happy to know that you have taken possession of your new establishment, and presume you will be eminently successful and happy in it, together with your good and family. You are no doubt already aware that I have had a most interesting visit from your most excellent and worthy friend President , with whom I have had a glorious frolic in the clear blue ocean; for [HC 6:71] most assuredly a frolic it was, without a moment’s reflection or consideration. Nothing of this kind would in the least attach me to your person or cause. I am capable of being a most undeviating friend, without being governed by the smallest religious influence.
As you have proved yourself to be a philosophical divine, you will excuse me when I say that we must leave their influence to the mass. The boldness of your plans and measures, to gether with their unparallelled success, so far, are calculated to throw a charm over your whole being, and to point you out as the most extraordinary man of the present age. But my mind is of so mathematical and philosophical a cast, that the divinity of Moses makes no impression on me, and you will not be offended when I say, that I rate you higher as a legislator than I do Moses, because we have you present with us for examination; whereas Moses derives his chief authority from prescription and the lapse of time. I cannot, however say but you are both right, it being out of the power of man to prove you wrong. It is no mathematical problem, and can therefore get no mathematical solution. I say, therefore, go ahead, you have my good wishes. You know Mahomet had his “right hand man.”
The celebrated Thomas Brown, of is now engaged in cutting your head on a beautiful cornelian stone, as your private seal, which will be set in gold to your order, and sent to you. It will be a gem and just what you want. His sister is a member of your church. The expense of this seal set in gold will be about $40. and Mr. Brown assures me that if he were not so poor a man he would present it to you free. You can, however, accept it or not, as he can apply it to another use. I am, myself short for cash, for although I had sometime since $2.000. paid me by the Harpers, publishers, as the first installment on the purchase of my copy right, yet I had got so much behind during the hard times that it all went to clear up old scores. I expect $38.000. more, however, in semi-annual payments from those gentlemen, within the limits of ten years, a large portion of which I intend to use in the State of , in the purchase and conduct of a large tract of land and therefore should I be compelled to announce, in [p. 1773]
11 November 1843 • Saturday
November 11 Saturday A company of Saints arrived from — the work is still prospering in that country, poverty and distress are making rapid strides, and the situation of the laboring classes is getting every day more deplorable.
City Council met. President, pro tem— appointed , Assessor and Collector for 1st. Ward. Daniel Hendricks for 2nd. Ward— 3rd. Ward, and for 4th. Ward.
12 November 1843 • Sunday
12 Sunday 12 Prayer meeting in the evening in the South East room of my old house.
clear, cold.
13 November 1843 • Monday
13 Monday 13 Having received a letter from Esq. I copy it.
, Oct. 24, 1843. Dear General,— I am happy to know that you have taken possession of your new establishment, and presume you will be eminently successful and happy in it, together with your good and family. You are no doubt already aware that I have had a most interesting visit from your most excellent and worthy friend President , with whom I have had a glorious frolic in the clear blue ocean; for [HC 6:71] most assuredly a frolic it was, without a moment’s reflection or consideration. Nothing of this kind would in the least attach me to your person or cause. I am capable of being a most undeviating friend, without being governed by the smallest religious influence.
As you have proved yourself to be a philosophical divine, you will excuse me when I say that we must leave their influence to the mass. The boldness of your plans and measures, to gether with their unparallelled success, so far, are calculated to throw a charm over your whole being, and to point you out as the most extraordinary man of the present age. But my mind is of so mathematical and philosophical a cast, that the divinity of Moses makes no impression on me, and you will not be offended when I say, that I rate you higher as a legislator than I do Moses, because we have you present with us for examination; whereas Moses derives his chief authority from prescription and the lapse of time. I cannot, however say but you are both right, it being out of the power of man to prove you wrong. It is no mathematical problem, and can therefore get no mathematical solution. I say, therefore, go ahead, you have my good wishes. You know Mahomet had his “right hand man.”
The celebrated Thomas Brown, of is now engaged in cutting your head on a beautiful cornelian stone, as your private seal, which will be set in gold to your order, and sent to you. It will be a gem and just what you want. His sister is a member of your church. The expense of this seal set in gold will be about $40. and Mr. Brown assures me that if he were not so poor a man he would present it to you free. You can, however, accept it or not, as he can apply it to another use. I am, myself short for cash, for although I had sometime since $2.000. paid me by the Harpers, publishers, as the first installment on the purchase of my copy right, yet I had got so much behind during the hard times that it all went to clear up old scores. I expect $38.000. more, however, in semi-annual payments from those gentlemen, within the limits of ten years, a large portion of which I intend to use in the State of , in the purchase and conduct of a large tract of land and therefore should I be compelled to announce, in [p. 1773]
Page 1773