History, 1838–1856, volume E-1 [1 July 1843–30 April 1844]

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
Page 1859
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<​January 9​> the store, all armed. Mr. Eldredge then told the company present, who he was, and demanded all in the house to assist in taking the prisoner, and then seized him, as soon as he laid hold of the prisoner about six or eight men laid hold of the Constable. Mr. Markham assisted the constable, when Mr. Markham had nearly succeeded in liberating the Constable, a man who was called Dr. Morrison drew his pistol and shot at Markham; the ball missed Markham: but came so near Mr. Coltrin’s head who was one of the assistants, as to graze his forehead. As there were only four of the assistants in the store they were overpowered by superior numbers and the prisoner was taken away from them. They saw that it would be impossible to take him without bloodshed, and consequently returned home. The parties engaged in this affray [HC 6:172] swore that regardless of all law they would defend the prisoner and he should not be taken.
We have received the above particulars from Mr. Markham and can consequently rely upon the correctness of the statement as he is one of the parties mentioned. The woman who was enciente who made the affidavit is not in the church, neither is , the person who was struck with the bayonet. has gone to the to make complaint.
We think that it is high time that prompt measures be taken to put a stop to such abominable outrages, if officers can be insulted in this manner and the law violated with impunity, we think that we shall speedily slide back into the barbarous ages. Some of our mobocratic friends, who assembled at a mobocratic meeting some time ago in were considerably chagrined at our terming them mobocrats, we wonder whether they now believe that they are or not? If such proceedings as those are cherished, farewell to our republican institutions; farewell to law, equity and justice, and farewell to all those sacred ties that bind men to their fellow men.
We would here ask where the Sheriff was? why was he not applied to? We merely ask for information: we don’t know that he was present or applied to. If he was it certainly was his duty to see the law magnified”
10 January 1844 • Wednesday
<​10​> Wednesday 10 At home— ordained Uncle a Patriarch. Enjoyed myself well in an interview with the Brethren and concluded to take a ride part way with my on his return to Macedonia—
In consequence of a visit of <​from​> some gentlemen of I called the city Council together at 7 p. m. I copy the minutes:—
“January 10th. 1844. 7 p m
Special Session. Names of members called.
The Mayor said:— ‘Messrs. Backman, Hamilton and Sherman Lawyers from have called on me, and told me that the occasion of the excitement at , and the resistance to the law in the case of the arrest of [Milton] Cook, was the late ordinance of this Council “to prevent unlawful search or seizure of person or property by foreign [HC 6:173] process in the city of .” That they considered said ordinance was designed to hinder the execution of the Statutes of within this : consequently they, the old citizens, felt disposed to stop the execution of process, issuing from the city precincts.—— [p. 1859]
January 9 the store, all armed. Mr. Eldredge then told the company present, who he was, and demanded all in the house to assist in taking the prisoner, and then seized him, as soon as he laid hold of the prisoner about six or eight men laid hold of the Constable. Mr. Markham assisted the constable, when Mr. Markham had nearly succeeded in liberating the Constable, a man who was called Dr. Morrison drew his pistol and shot at Markham; the ball missed Markham: but came so near Mr. Coltrin’s head who was one of the assistants, as to graze his forehead. As there were only four of the assistants in the store they were overpowered by superior numbers and the prisoner was taken away from them. They saw that it would be impossible to take him without bloodshed, and consequently returned home. The parties engaged in this affray [HC 6:172] swore that regardless of all law they would defend the prisoner and he should not be taken.
We have received the above particulars from Mr. Markham and can consequently rely upon the correctness of the statement as he is one of the parties mentioned. The woman who was enciente who made the affidavit is not in the church, neither is , the person who was struck with the bayonet. has gone to the to make complaint.
We think that it is high time that prompt measures be taken to put a stop to such abominable outrages, if officers can be insulted in this manner and the law violated with impunity, we think that we shall speedily slide back into the barbarous ages. Some of our mobocratic friends, who assembled at a mobocratic meeting some time ago in were considerably chagrined at our terming them mobocrats, we wonder whether they now believe that they are or not? If such proceedings as those are cherished, farewell to our republican institutions; farewell to law, equity and justice, and farewell to all those sacred ties that bind men to their fellow men.
We would here ask where the Sheriff was? why was he not applied to? We merely ask for information: we don’t know that he was present or applied to. If he was it certainly was his duty to see the law magnified”
10 January 1844 • Wednesday
10 Wednesday 10 At home— ordained Uncle a Patriarch. Enjoyed myself well in an interview with the Brethren and concluded to take a ride part way with my on his return to Macedonia—
In consequence of a visit from some gentlemen of I called the city Council together at 7 p. m. I copy the minutes:—
“January 10th. 1844. 7 p m
Special Session. Names of members called.
The Mayor said:— ‘Messrs. Backman, Hamilton and Sherman Lawyers from have called on me, and told me that the occasion of the excitement at , and the resistance to the law in the case of the arrest of Milton Cook, was the late ordinance of this Council “to prevent unlawful search or seizure of person or property by foreign [HC 6:173] process in the city of .” That they considered said ordinance was designed to hinder the execution of the Statutes of within this : consequently they, the old citizens, felt disposed to stop the execution of process, issuing from the city precincts.—— [p. 1859]
Page 1859