History, 1838–1856, volume E-1 [1 July 1843–30 April 1844]

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
Page 1876
image
<​February 5​> be semi-circular— that the [HC 6:196] building was too low for round windows: I told him I would have the circles if he had to make the ten feet higher than it was originally calculated— that one light at the centre of each circular window would be sufficient to light the whole room— that when the whole building was thus illuminated the effect would be remarkably grand. “I wish you to carry out my designs. I have seen in vision the splendid appearance of that building illuminated and will have it built according to the pattern shewn me”.
Called at my in the evening, and revised my “Views of the powers and policy of the Government of the .” I was the first one who publicly proposed a National Bank on the principles set forth in that pamphlet.
6 February 1844 • Tuesday
<​6.​> Tuesday 6. Very cold day. I spent the evening with my Brother , , and the Twelve Apostles, and their wives at Elder ’s; took supper, and had a very pleasant time—
7 February 1844 • Wednesday
<​7.​> Wednesday 7. An exceedingly cold day. In the evening I met with my brother and the Twelve Apostles in my , at their request, to devise means to promote the interests of the General Government. I completed and signed my “Views of the powers and policy of the Government of the ”. which I here insert:—
Born in a land of liberty, and breathing an air uncorrupted with the sirocco of barbarous climes, I ever feel a double anxiety for the happiness of all men, both in time and in eternity. My cogitations like Daniel’s, have for a long time troubled me, when I viewed the condition of men throughout the world, and more especially in this boasted realm, where the Declaration of Independence “holds these truths to be self evident; that all men are created equal; that they are endowed by their Creator, with certain unalienable rights; that among these are life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness,” but at the same time, some two or three millions of people are held as slaves for life, because the spirit in them is covered with a darker skin than ours; and hundreds of our own kindred for an infraction, or supposed in[HC 6:197]fraction, of some over-wise statute, have to be incarcerated in dungeon glooms, or suffer the more moral penitentiary gravitation of mercy, in a nut-shell, while the duellist, the debauchee, and the defaulter for millions, and other criminals, take the uppermost rooms at feasts, or, like the bird of passage, find a more congenial clime by flight.
The wisdom, which ought to characterize the freest, wisest, and most noble nation of the nineteenth century, should, like the sun in his meridian splendor, warm every object beneath its rays; and the main efforts of her officers, who are nothing more or less that the servants of the people, ought to be directed to ameliorate the condition of all: black or white, bond or free; for the best of books says “God hath, made of one blood all nations of men, for to dwell on all the face of the earth”. [p. 1876]
February 5 be semi-circular— that the [HC 6:196] building was too low for round windows: I told him I would have the circles if he had to make the ten feet higher than it was originally calculated— that one light at the centre of each circular window would be sufficient to light the whole room— that when the whole building was thus illuminated the effect would be remarkably grand. “I wish you to carry out my designs. I have seen in vision the splendid appearance of that building illuminated and will have it built according to the pattern shewn me”.
Called at my in the evening, and revised my “Views of the powers and policy of the Government of the .” I was the first one who publicly proposed a National Bank on the principles set forth in that pamphlet.
6 February 1844 • Tuesday
6. Tuesday 6. Very cold day. I spent the evening with my Brother , , and the Twelve Apostles, and their wives at Elder ’s; took supper, and had a very pleasant time—
7 February 1844 • Wednesday
7. Wednesday 7. An exceedingly cold day. In the evening I met with my brother and the Twelve Apostles in my , at their request, to devise means to promote the interests of the General Government. I completed and signed my “Views of the powers and policy of the Government of the ”. which I here insert:—
Born in a land of liberty, and breathing an air uncorrupted with the sirocco of barbarous climes, I ever feel a double anxiety for the happiness of all men, both in time and in eternity. My cogitations like Daniel’s, have for a long time troubled me, when I viewed the condition of men throughout the world, and more especially in this boasted realm, where the Declaration of Independence “holds these truths to be self evident; that all men are created equal; that they are endowed by their Creator, with certain unalienable rights; that among these are life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness,” but at the same time, some two or three millions of people are held as slaves for life, because the spirit in them is covered with a darker skin than ours; and hundreds of our own kindred for an infraction, or supposed in[HC 6:197]fraction, of some over-wise statute, have to be incarcerated in dungeon glooms, or suffer the more moral penitentiary gravitation of mercy, in a nut-shell, while the duellist, the debauchee, and the defaulter for millions, and other criminals, take the uppermost rooms at feasts, or, like the bird of passage, find a more congenial clime by flight.
The wisdom, which ought to characterize the freest, wisest, and most noble nation of the nineteenth century, should, like the sun in his meridian splendor, warm every object beneath its rays; and the main efforts of her officers, who are nothing more or less that the servants of the people, ought to be directed to ameliorate the condition of all: black or white, bond or free; for the best of books says “God hath, made of one blood all nations of men, for to dwell on all the face of the earth”. [p. 1876]
Page 1876