History, 1838–1856, volume E-1 [1 July 1843–30 April 1844]

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
Page 1892
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<​February 15.​> teemed with this filthy trash, and even men who ought to have more respect for themselves; men contending for the gubernatorial chair have made use of terms so degrading, so mean, so humiliating, that a billings gate fisherwoman would have considered herself disgraced with. We refuse any longer to be thus bedaubed for either party; we tell all such to let their filth flow in its own legitimate channel, for we are sick of the loathsome smell.
Gentlemen, we are not going either to “murder , nor a mormon in this for not giving us his money;” nor are we going to “walk on the water; “ nor “drown a woman”; nor “defraud the poor of their property;” nor send “destroying Angels after to kill him”: nor “marry spiritual wives;” nor commit any other outrageous act this election to help any party with, you must get some other persons to perform these kind offices for you for the future. We withdraw.
Under existing circumstances we have no other alternative, and if we can accomplish our object, well; if not we shall have the satisfaction of knowing that we have acted conscientiously and have used our best judgment; and if we have to throw away our votes, we had better do so upon a worthy, rather than upon an unworthy individual, who might make use of the weapon we put in his hand to destroy us with.
Whatever may be the opinions of men in general, in regard to Mr. Smith, we know that he need only to be known, to be admired; and that it is the principles of honor, integrity, patriotism, and philanthropy, that has elevated him in the minds of his friends, and the same principles if seen and known would beget the esteem and confidence of all the patriotic and virtuous throughout the Union.
Whatever therefore be the opinions of other men our course is marked out, and our motto from henceforth will be General Joseph Smith.” [HC 6:217]
16 February 1844 • Friday
<​16.​> Friday 16. At home. This evening I spent two hours in the . Settled with ; gave him deed of several town lots, and took his receipt in full.
17 February 1844 • Saturday
<​17.​> Saturday 17. I wrote the following article:—
Pacific Innuendo.
The very candid, pacific, and highly creditable advice, which has done himself the honor to address to “the Citizens of , Mormons and all,” and which appears in the “ Signal,” of the 14th. inst., is, like the balm of Gilead, well calculated to ease the pain, which has troubled the heads and hearts of the Carthagenians, Warsaw<​iains​>, and other over jealous bodies for weal and wo.
It certainly must be admitted, on all hands, that has exalted himself as a mediator, patriot, lawyer, Governor, peacemaker, and friend of all: not only to magnify the law and make it honorable, but also in pointing out the path of peace. Such is what the Latter day Saints have ever sought at the hands of those in authority; and with an approving conscience, clear as the crystal Spring: and with a laudable intention, warm as the summer [p. 1892]
February 15. teemed with this filthy trash, and even men who ought to have more respect for themselves; men contending for the gubernatorial chair have made use of terms so degrading, so mean, so humiliating, that a billings gate fisherwoman would have considered herself disgraced with. We refuse any longer to be thus bedaubed for either party; we tell all such to let their filth flow in its own legitimate channel, for we are sick of the loathsome smell.
Gentlemen, we are not going either to “murder , nor a mormon in this for not giving us his money;” nor are we going to “walk on the water; “ nor “drown a woman”; nor “defraud the poor of their property;” nor send “destroying Angels after to kill him”: nor “marry spiritual wives;” nor commit any other outrageous act this election to help any party with, you must get some other persons to perform these kind offices for you for the future. We withdraw.
Under existing circumstances we have no other alternative, and if we can accomplish our object, well; if not we shall have the satisfaction of knowing that we have acted conscientiously and have used our best judgment; and if we have to throw away our votes, we had better do so upon a worthy, rather than upon an unworthy individual, who might make use of the weapon we put in his hand to destroy us with.
Whatever may be the opinions of men in general, in regard to Mr. Smith, we know that he need only to be known, to be admired; and that it is the principles of honor, integrity, patriotism, and philanthropy, that has elevated him in the minds of his friends, and the same principles if seen and known would beget the esteem and confidence of all the patriotic and virtuous throughout the Union.
Whatever therefore be the opinions of other men our course is marked out, and our motto from henceforth will be General Joseph Smith.” [HC 6:217]
16 February 1844 • Friday
16. Friday 16. At home. This evening I spent two hours in the . Settled with ; gave him deed of several town lots, and took his receipt in full.
17 February 1844 • Saturday
17. Saturday 17. I wrote the following article:—
Pacific Innuendo.
The very candid, pacific, and highly creditable advice, which has done himself the honor to address to “the Citizens of , Mormons and all,” and which appears in the “ Signal,” of the 14th. inst., is, like the balm of Gilead, well calculated to ease the pain, which has troubled the heads and hearts of the Carthagenians, Warsawiains, and other over jealous bodies for weal and wo.
It certainly must be admitted, on all hands, that has exalted himself as a mediator, patriot, lawyer, Governor, peacemaker, and friend of all: not only to magnify the law and make it honorable, but also in pointing out the path of peace. Such is what the Latter day Saints have ever sought at the hands of those in authority; and with an approving conscience, clear as the crystal Spring: and with a laudable intention, warm as the summer [p. 1892]
Page 1892