History, 1838–1856, volume E-1 [1 July 1843–30 April 1844]

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
Page 1691
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<​August 13​> inhabitants of this than any despot of the eastern country over his serfs. I met him, and he gave me some abusive language, taking up a stone to throw at me: I seized him by the throat to choke him off. He then spoke of Esquire interfering when he had no business, and of the abuses he received at the election on the hill.
They got a constable by the name of King; I don’t know what need there was of a Constable. Old Father Perry said “why you can’t vote in this precinct”; King took me by the collar, and told me to go away. All our wrongs have arisen under the power and authority of democracy, and I have sworn that this arm shall fall from my shoulder, and this tongue cleave to the roof of my mouth, before I will vote for them, unless they make me satisfaction; and I feel it sensibly. I was abused and neglected at the ground, and there was not a man in the crowd to say “this is brother Joseph, or this is the Mayor.”
He then spoke of the grog shops, and the disturbance of the crowd in the street by Moesser’s grocery.
I have been ferretting out grog shops, groceries, and beer barrels. I have warned the rum and beer dealers to be scarce after this time, and the peace officers to watch the grog shops, and give me seasonable notice of any disorder. If they are conducted as they have been I will rip them up.”
He then sat down but resumed
“I had forgotten one thing; we have had certain traders in this , who have been writing falsehoods [HC 5:531] to ; and there is a certain man in this who has made a covenant to betray and give me up to the Missourians, and that too before commenced his persecutions. That man is no other than : this testimony I have from gentlemen from abroad whose names I do not wish to give. I most solemnly proclaim the withdrawal of my fellowship from this man on condition that the foregoing be true, and let the Saints proclaim it abroad that he may no longer be acknowledged as my Counsellor; and all who feel to sanction my proceedings and views will manifest it by uplifted hands.”
There was a unanimous vote that be disfellowshipped and his license demanded.
The Twelve Apostles held meetings in various parts of .
14 August 1843 • Monday
<​14​> Monday. Rode out at 9 A.M. At home at 1 p.m. In the evening attended the funeral of , who died at my house yesterday. <​¶​> I copy from the State Register, as follows:
“We have seen and heard a statement that had delayed making a decision upon the demand of for the militia to arrest Joseph Smith until after the election, so as by intimidation to compel the Mormons to vote the democratic ticket. The authors of this desperate and reckless slander, take counsel from their own corrupt hearts, and judge others by a knowledge of what they would do in like case. No doubt, but that they would do this, and more too, if necessary, to secure the success of their party, and hence their readiness to believe evil of others. If, however they had been in the least degree inclined to judge correctly, they would have gone as we have done to the records of the Secretary’s office, where they would have ascertained that all these suspicions were groundless; and that the had actually decided not to call out the Militia, eleven days before the election.” [p. 1691]
August 13 inhabitants of this than any despot of the eastern country over his serfs. I met him, and he gave me some abusive language, taking up a stone to throw at me: I seized him by the throat to choke him off. He then spoke of Esquire interfering when he had no business, and of the abuses he received at the election on the hill.
They got a constable by the name of King; I don’t know what need there was of a Constable. Old Father Perry said “why you can’t vote in this precinct”; King took me by the collar, and told me to go away. All our wrongs have arisen under the power and authority of democracy, and I have sworn that this arm shall fall from my shoulder, and this tongue cleave to the roof of my mouth, before I will vote for them, unless they make me satisfaction; and I feel it sensibly. I was abused and neglected at the ground, and there was not a man in the crowd to say “this is brother Joseph, or this is the Mayor.”
He then spoke of the grog shops, and the disturbance of the crowd in the street by Moesser’s grocery.
I have been ferretting out grog shops, groceries, and beer barrels. I have warned the rum and beer dealers to be scarce after this time, and the peace officers to watch the grog shops, and give me seasonable notice of any disorder. If they are conducted as they have been I will rip them up.”
He then sat down but resumed
“I had forgotten one thing; we have had certain traders in this , who have been writing falsehoods [HC 5:531] to ; and there is a certain man in this who has made a covenant to betray and give me up to the Missourians, and that too before commenced his persecutions. That man is no other than : this testimony I have from gentlemen from abroad whose names I do not wish to give. I most solemnly proclaim the withdrawal of my fellowship from this man on condition that the foregoing be true, and let the Saints proclaim it abroad that he may no longer be acknowledged as my Counsellor; and all who feel to sanction my proceedings and views will manifest it by uplifted hands.”
There was a unanimous vote that be disfellowshipped and his license demanded.
The Twelve Apostles held meetings in various parts of .
14 August 1843 • Monday
14 Monday. Rode out at 9 A.M. At home at 1 p.m. In the evening attended the funeral of , who died at my house yesterday. ¶ I copy from the State Register, as follows:
“We have seen and heard a statement that had delayed making a decision upon the demand of for the militia to arrest Joseph Smith until after the election, so as by intimidation to compel the Mormons to vote the democratic ticket. The authors of this desperate and reckless slander, take counsel from their own corrupt hearts, and judge others by a knowledge of what they would do in like case. No doubt, but that they would do this, and more too, if necessary, to secure the success of their party, and hence their readiness to believe evil of others. If, however they had been in the least degree inclined to judge correctly, they would have gone as we have done to the records of the Secretary’s office, where they would have ascertained that all these suspicions were groundless; and that the had actually decided not to call out the Militia, eleven days before the election.” [p. 1691]
Page 1691