History, 1838–1856, volume E-1 [1 July 1843–30 April 1844]

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
Page 1697
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<​August 21​> in ; and to shew his how much responsibility he and the were under in case the Prophet should not be delivered up on the requisition of , where, according to the nicest calculations of the famous lawyer Hall, taking ’s case for a sample, if he was discharged upon his trial, ‘the power of man could not save him’!!!
As to the non-intercourse or “restrictions” which may assume, or inflict over the citizens of , we have nothing to say. The Latter day Saints have seen ’ signature to such a Bill as that, and many know the penalty.
There is little need of comment on Mr. Hall’s famous letter, for to us it seems to be of itself, a comment that makes honesty, virtue, and common sense blush; and law, liberty and republicanism shudder! We appeal to the liberal minded and proud hearted Americans, whether such a spot upon the withering character of , could be removed any more than an African could be washed white, or a wolf be possessed— of the innocence of a lamb, unless the Lord interfered.
Talk of justice in ! You might as well make a burning lime kiln or coal pit an ice house or a hospital! The ice would melt, and the sick would suffocate, and the power of man could not save them!’ No wonder a negro could be burnt alive in ! No wonder a criminal could be taken out of jail and murdered, while the Sheriff held a respite in his hand, in ; and no wonder that a Mormon will not risk his life in ; the power of man cannot save him, even if discharged by what is styled a court of justice!’
To glance at the whole without recurring to the many crimes of the people of the , officially or unofficially, whether it be feeding prisoners on human flesh or taking them out of jail and lynching them without mercy to help justice beforehand, or whether it be ’ exterminating order, or even the present hint at restriction and assumption of responsibility, we are apt to believe that the good sense and virtue of the citizens of in general, and the Mormons especially, like the old experienced rat will shun as a whitened heap under which there is mischief concealed!”
Rode out with Mr Moore; in the afternoon held May[HC 5:540]or’s court and tried F<​rederick​> J. Moesser for breach of temperance ordinance. Fined him $3:00 and costs.
Mary Ann Young, daughter of Elder died, aged six years and eight months, of <​dropsy round the heart.​>
Elders , and arrived at
22 August 1843 • Tuesday
<​22​> Tuesday. Held Mayors court & fined for selling spirits without a license.
We constantly hear rumors that the people of are determined to raise a mob to drive the Mormons out of the . ¶ My brother has gone to .
23 August 1843 • Wednesday
<​23​> Wednesday. <​I attended​> Mayor’s court and tried several suits. ¶ <​Sent to to procure some articles for the .​>
Elders and arrived in accompanied by Elders and . [p. 1697]
August 21 in ; and to shew his how much responsibility he and the were under in case the Prophet should not be delivered up on the requisition of , where, according to the nicest calculations of the famous lawyer Hall, taking ’s case for a sample, if he was discharged upon his trial, ‘the power of man could not save him’!!!
As to the non-intercourse or “restrictions” which may assume, or inflict over the citizens of , we have nothing to say. The Latter day Saints have seen ’ signature to such a Bill as that, and many know the penalty.
There is little need of comment on Mr. Hall’s famous letter, for to us it seems to be of itself, a comment that makes honesty, virtue, and common sense blush; and law, liberty and republicanism shudder! We appeal to the liberal minded and proud hearted Americans, whether such a spot upon the withering character of , could be removed any more than an African could be washed white, or a wolf be possessed— of the innocence of a lamb, unless the Lord interfered.
Talk of justice in ! You might as well make a burning lime kiln or coal pit an ice house or a hospital! The ice would melt, and the sick would suffocate, and the power of man could not save them!’ No wonder a negro could be burnt alive in ! No wonder a criminal could be taken out of jail and murdered, while the Sheriff held a respite in his hand, in ; and no wonder that a Mormon will not risk his life in ; the power of man cannot save him, even if discharged by what is styled ‘a court of justice!’
To glance at the whole without recurring to the many crimes of the people of the , officially or unofficially, whether it be feeding prisoners on human flesh or taking them out of jail and lynching them without mercy to help justice beforehand, or whether it be ’ exterminating order, or even the present hint at restriction and assumption of responsibility, we are apt to believe that the good sense and virtue of the citizens of in general, and the Mormons especially, like the old experienced rat will shun as a whitened heap under which there is mischief concealed!”
Rode out with Mr Moore; in the afternoon held May[HC 5:540]or’s court and tried Frederick J. Moesser for breach of temperance ordinance. Fined him $3:00 and costs.
Mary Ann Young, daughter of Elder died, aged six years and eight months, of dropsy round the heart.
Elders , and arrived at
22 August 1843 • Tuesday
22 Tuesday. Held Mayors court & fined for selling spirits without a license.
We constantly hear rumors that the people of are determined to raise a mob to drive the Mormons out of the . ¶ My brother has gone to .
23 August 1843 • Wednesday
23 Wednesday. I attended Mayor’s court and tried several suits. ¶ Sent to to procure some articles for the .
Elders and arrived in accompanied by Elders and . [p. 1697]
Page 1697