History, 1838–1856, volume E-1 [1 July 1843–30 April 1844]

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
Page 1939
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<​March 24​> would be made to your election on Constitutional principles; which we shall be obliged to submit to, unless there be some method of avoiding it which we are unacquainted with, and that constitutionally as our Magna charta must be supported.
I suggested the idea to the Council and it was decided that I should write you and state the case requesting a communication from you on this subject.
You are the man of our choice, as facts have already proved to you, but if we cannot be gratified we must look elsewhere though as yet we are quite undecided as to the man.
Your friends here expect you will not alter your course, in relation to this matter; though you may not get the title of Vice President, yet, there are other stations, where you may render as important service to the country, and as valuable to yourself.
and I am further authorized by Gen. Smith to say to , Go-a-head and make all the wake you can. Get Gen. Smith elected President and name your office; only permit him Pharaoh-like to be greatest in the throne, as all former Prophets have been. will you go it?—
Circumstances of a peculiarly interesting character are in progress, relative to which if carried out, may open a field capacious enough for your contemplation and operations for the time being should your inclinations lead you towards that delightful climate for a little season:— The full development of which I am not at liberty to write at this time.
Suffice it to say if by your exertion you can help save the nation by electing Gen. Smith— You will find business to your satisfaction afterwards.
In the mean time let me hear from you often— while I remain
Yours truly
.
25 March 1844 • Monday
<​25​> Monday 25 At home in the morning— after dinner rode up to the Upper landing to see the “St. Louis Oak” Steamer; learned that a company of Emigrants from were expected soon— called at my on returning, and heard read the Draft of a Memorial to Congress which my had been writing, as a Committee appointed by the Council on Thursday last and was pleased with the instrument.
Milllions of wild pigeons flying North— and millions of gnats dancing in the air— dull day, at night thunder, lightning and rain.
26 March 1844 • Tuesday
<​26 ​> Tuesday 26 Dull day— From 9 to 12 noon in Council, also from 2 to 5 p. m.
The Memorial, drawn up by , was read discussed and approved by the General Council. [p. 1939]
March 24
25 March 1844 • Monday
25 Monday 25 At home in the morning— after dinner rode up to the Upper landing to see the “St. Louis Oak” Steamer; learned that a company of Emigrants from were expected soon— called at my on returning, and heard read the Draft of a Memorial to Congress which my had been writing, as a Committee appointed by the Council on Thursday last and was pleased with the instrument.
Milllions of wild pigeons flying North— and millions of gnats dancing in the air— dull day, at night thunder, lightning and rain.
26 March 1844 • Tuesday
26 Tuesday 26 Dull day— From 9 to 12 noon in Council, also from 2 to 5 p. m.
The Memorial, drawn up by , was read discussed and approved by the General Council. [p. 1939]
Page 1939