History, 1838–1856, volume E-1 [1 July 1843–30 April 1844]

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
Page 1698
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<​August 23​> Sent to to procure some articles for the
24 August 1843 • Thursday
<​24​> <​Thursday.​> Engaged inland business, selling and making titles of land & settling with several individuals.
25 August 1843 • Friday
<​25​> <​Friday.​> My brother in the , We conversed upon <​conversing about​> the new Revelation <​upon celestial marriage.​>
Rain in gentle showers through the day, being the first of any amount that has fallen in since the 1st. of June. The earth has been exceedingly dry, and the early Potatoe nearly destroyed, Corn has been stunted in its growth, and even vines much injured by the drouth.
26 August 1843 • Saturday
<​26​> <​Saturday​> Six hundred houses destroyed by fire in Kingston, Jamaica; estimated damage $1,500,000.
The U. S. Steam Frigate “Missouri” destroyed by fire.
Elder returned from his Mission to the Lamanites <​exploring excursion West.​> The following is extracted from his journal; [HC 5:541]
“Saturday July 16th. 1843. Staid all day at — all night at Mr. Hawley’s. Sunday 17th. Miss Daniels finished my tent— &c. left Hawleys at 12 o’Clock went 15 miles, and camped for <​the​> night; in the morning our horses were gone, we hunted for them some time before we found them. 18th. July left the Camp at 7 o’Clock, travelled all day, came within 16 miles of the Agency, camped on the prairie. Tuesday 19th. left the Camp at 6 O’Clock— passed the Agents house half past 12.— Came to Sugar Grove creek— stopped rested our horses, took dinner &c at 2 oClock p.m.;— stopped at dark on Mosquito Creek and staid all night. Wednesday 20 started out at 6 O’Clock, travelled 30 miles, fell in with the Sac Indians <​who​> had been to the old Sac village after corn— At night they got drunk and fought. We encamped at dark <​and​> staid all night in the Timber on the a bank Bluff of the Desmoines river. Started late in <​the​> morning of Thursday 21<​st.​> we travelled until 12 O’Clock, stopped on the round flat of the Desmoines river (here another drunken frolic which lasted all the afternoon,) left the ground <​at​> ½ past 2 p.m. <​and​> went 13 miles, came within 20 miles of the Garrison troops or Sac settlement, <​and​> encamped on the edge of the prairie— Friday 22 July,— left for the Sac village, at noon we got parted from each other and the Indians got drunk and quarreled and Captain Joe would not <​go​> any further, he lay down— was mad, and I could not get him to go, so I left him and went to<​wards​> the Sac village, staid all night at the trading house. Saturday morning 23 July came to the Sac village and waited for Captain Joe to arrive with his party. Sunday 24th. staid at the Sacs, waiting for my pilot, who was sick and lame in one knee so <​that​> he could not travel. Monday 25th. This morning at Wapamuneto’s,— staid until noon of Tuesday 26th. then Neotaneah, my guide came, <​and​> we started off immediately for : staid on the Prairie all night. Wednesday 27th. travelled until noon, baited our horses, no water, <​we had​> nothing to eat; <​continued our journey, it​> rained all afternoon, staid all night on the prairie— lay in the wet grass. Thursday 28 started on our journey this morning early. Saw in [HC 5:542] the forenoon a flock of Elk. The Indian went up the hollow to shoot one, while I held the horses out of sight of the Elk, he crawled in the grass some fifty or sixty rods, and snapped four times at them, when they were a laying down, he could not get his gun off; the Elk run off a rifle shot and looked at him, he broke his gun to pieces on the ground and threw it away down the hill and came back [p. 1698]
August
24 August 1843 • Thursday
24 Thursday. Engaged inland business, selling and making titles of land & settling with several individuals.
25 August 1843 • Friday
25 Friday. My brother in the , conversing about the new Revelation upon celestial marriage.
Rain in gentle showers through the day, being the first of any amount that has fallen in since the 1st. of June. The earth has been exceedingly dry, and the early Potatoe nearly destroyed, Corn has been stunted in its growth, and even vines much injured by the drouth.
26 August 1843 • Saturday
26 Saturday Six hundred houses destroyed by fire in Kingston, Jamaica; estimated damage $1,500,000.
The U. S. Steam Frigate “Missouri” destroyed by fire.
Elder returned from his exploring excursion West. The following is extracted from his journal; [HC 5:541]
“Saturday July 16th. 1843. Staid all day at — all night at Mr. Hawley’s. Sunday 17th. Miss Daniels finished my tent— &c. left Hawleys at 12 o’Clock went 15 miles, and camped for the night; in the morning our horses were gone, we hunted for them some time before we found them. 18th. July left the Camp at 7 o’Clock, travelled all day, came within 16 miles of the Agency, camped on the prairie. Tuesday 19th. left the Camp at 6 O’Clock— passed the Agents house half past 12.— Came to Sugar Grove creek— stopped rested our horses, took dinner &c at 2 oClock p.m.;— stopped at dark on Mosquito Creek and staid all night. Wednesday 20 started out at 6 O’Clock, travelled 30 miles, fell in with the Sac Indians who had been to the old Sac village after corn— At night they got drunk and fought. We encamped at dark and staid all night in the Timber on a bank Bluff of the Desmoines river. Started late in the morning of Thursday 21st. we travelled until 12 O’Clock, stopped on the round flat of the Desmoines river (here another drunken frolic which lasted all the afternoon,) left the ground at ½ past 2 p.m. and went 13 miles, came within 20 miles of the Garrison troops or Sac settlement, and encamped on the edge of the prairie— Friday 22 July,— left for the Sac village, at noon we got parted from each other and the Indians got drunk and quarreled and Captain Joe would not go any further, he lay down— was mad, and I could not get him to go, so I left him and went towards the Sac village, staid all night at the trading house. Saturday morning 23 July came to the Sac village and waited for Captain Joe to arrive with his party. Sunday 24th. staid at the Sacs, waiting for my pilot, who was sick and lame in one knee so that he could not travel. Monday 25th. This morning at Wapamuneto’s,— staid until noon of Tuesday 26th. then Neotaneah, my guide came, and we started off immediately for : staid on the Prairie all night. Wednesday 27th. travelled until noon, baited our horses, no water, we had nothing to eat; continued our journey, it rained all afternoon, staid all night on the prairie— lay in the wet grass. Thursday 28 started on our journey this morning early. Saw in [HC 5:542] the forenoon a flock of Elk. The Indian went up the hollow to shoot one, while I held the horses out of sight of the Elk, he crawled in the grass some fifty or sixty rods, and snapped four times at them, when they were a laying down, he could not get his gun off; the Elk run off a rifle shot and looked at him, he broke his gun to pieces on the ground and threw it away down the hill and came back [p. 1698]
Page 1698