History, 1838–1856, volume E-1 [1 July 1843–30 April 1844]

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
Page 1880
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<​February 7​> The government has once flourished under the guidance of trusty servants; and the Hon. Mr. Munroe [James Monroe] in his day, while speaking of the Constitution; says, “Our commerce has been wisely regulated with foreign nations, and between the States; new States have been admitted into our union our territory has been enlarged by fair and honorable treaty, and with great advantage to the original States; the states respectively protected by the national government, under a mild paternal system against foreign dangers, and enjoying within their separate spheres, by a wise partition of power, a just proportion of the Sovereignty, have improved their police, extended their settlements, and attained a strength and maturity which are the best proofs of [HC 6:201] wholesome laws well administered. And if we look to the condition of individuals, what a proud spectacle does it exhibit? <​on whom has oppression fallen in any quarter of our Union?​> who has been deprived of any right of person or property? who restrained from offering his vows in the mode— which he prefers, to the Divine Author of his being? It is well known that all these blessings have been enjoyed in their fullest extent; and I add, with peculiar satisfaction, that there has been no example of a capital punishment being inflicted on any one for the crime of high treason.” What a delightful picture, of power, policy and prosperity! Truly the wise man’s proverb is just: “Sedankauh teromain goy, veh-ka-sade le-u-meem khahmant”. Righteousness exalteth a nation, but sin is a reproach to any people.
But this is not all. The same honorable statesman, after having had about forty years experience in the government, under the full tide of successful experiment, gives the following commendatory assurance of the efficiency of the magna charta to answer its great end and aim: To protect the people in their rights. “Such, then, is the happy government under which we live; a government adequate to every purpose for which the social compact is formed: a government elective in all its branches, under which every citizen may, by his merit, obtain the highest trust recognized by the Constitution; which contains within it no cause of discord; none to put at variance one portion of the community with another; a government which protects every citizen in the full enjoyment of his rights, and is able to protect the nation against injustice from foreign powers.”
Again, the younger in the silver age of our country’s advancement to fame, in his inaugural address; (1825) thus candidly declares the majesty of the youthful Republic, in its increasing greatness, “The year of jubilee since the first formation of our union has just elapsed; that of the declaration of Independence is at hand. The consummation of both was effected by this Constitution. Since that period, a population of four millions has multiplied to Twelve. A Territory, bounded by the , has been extended from sea to sea. New States have been admitted to the union, in numbers nearly equal to those of the first confederation. Treaties of peace, amity and commerce, have been concluded with the [p. 1880]
February 7 The government has once flourished under the guidance of trusty servants; and the Hon. Mr. Munroe [James Monroe] in his day, while speaking of the Constitution; says, “Our commerce has been wisely regulated with foreign nations, and between the States; new States have been admitted into our union our territory has been enlarged by fair and honorable treaty, and with great advantage to the original States; the states respectively protected by the national government, under a mild paternal system against foreign dangers, and enjoying within their separate spheres, by a wise partition of power, a just proportion of the Sovereignty, have improved their police, extended their settlements, and attained a strength and maturity which are the best proofs of [HC 6:201] wholesome laws well administered. And if we look to the condition of individuals, what a proud spectacle does it exhibit? on whom has oppression fallen in any quarter of our Union? who has been deprived of any right of person or property? who restrained from offering his vows in the mode— which he prefers, to the Divine Author of his being? It is well known that all these blessings have been enjoyed in their fullest extent; and I add, with peculiar satisfaction, that there has been no example of a capital punishment being inflicted on any one for the crime of high treason.” What a delightful picture, of power, policy and prosperity! Truly the wise man’s proverb is just: “Sedankauh teromain goy, veh-ka-sade le-u-meem khahmant”. Righteousness exalteth a nation, but sin is a reproach to any people.
But this is not all. The same honorable statesman, after having had about forty years experience in the government, under the full tide of successful experiment, gives the following commendatory assurance of the efficiency of the magna charta to answer its great end and aim: To protect the people in their rights. “Such, then, is the happy government under which we live; a government adequate to every purpose for which the social compact is formed: a government elective in all its branches, under which every citizen may, by his merit, obtain the highest trust recognized by the Constitution; which contains within it no cause of discord; none to put at variance one portion of the community with another; a government which protects every citizen in the full enjoyment of his rights, and is able to protect the nation against injustice from foreign powers.”
Again, the younger in the silver age of our country’s advancement to fame, in his inaugural address; (1825) thus candidly declares the majesty of the youthful Republic, in its increasing greatness, “The year of jubilee since the first formation of our union has just elapsed; that of the declaration of Independence is at hand. The consummation of both was effected by this Constitution. Since that period, a population of four millions has multiplied to Twelve. A Territory, bounded by the , has been extended from sea to sea. New States have been admitted to the union, in numbers nearly equal to those of the first confederation. Treaties of peace, amity and commerce, have been concluded with the [p. 1880]
Page 1880