History, 1838–1856, volume E-1 [1 July 1843–30 April 1844]

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
Page 1910
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<​March 7​> Now if they will not let the people bring in their produce, the people will not buy their goods; and the result will be, the merchants will get the spirit of mobocracy. Another man, (I will not call his name) has been writing to the Tribune some of the most disgraceful things possible to name. He says in that article, that there are a great many donations to the which have been appropriated to other purposes. His object evidently was to stigmatize the Trustee, and excite prejudice against us abroad. But I pledge myself that whoever has contributed any old shoes, harness, horses, waggons, or anything else, if he will come forward I will show that every farthing is on the book and has been appropriated for the building of the . I pledge myself that if he finds the first farthing that we cannot show where it has been appropriated I will give him my head for a foot ball. He also states that the cannot be built it costs so much:— who does not know that we can put the roof on the building this season if we have a mind to? By turning all the means from the , and doubling our diligence, we can do it. [HC 6:239]
There are men in our midst who are trying to build up themselves at our expense, and others who are watching for iniquity, and will make a man an offender for a word. The best way for such men is to be still. If I did not love men I would not reprove them, but would work in the dark as they do. As to who is the author of the article in the Tribune, read it, and you will see for yourselves. He is not a lawyer— he is nearer related to a doctor— a small man. (Mr. Mc.Neil enquired if he was the man) No; I do not know you; you are a stranger. But I will rest myself and give way for others.
Prest. arose and made a few remarks. He compared the lawyers to polliwags, wiglers and toads; he said they would dry up next fall
“Those characters I presume were made in gizzard making time, when it was cheaper to get gizzards than souls, for if a soul cost $5.00, a gizzard would cost nothing; like tree toads they change color to suit the object they are upon; they ought to be ferreted out like rats— you could describe them as you would a hedgehog; they are in every hedge stinking like the skunk.
asked if Joseph meant him. Joseph said, I will reply by asking you a question. “That is no way” Joseph “Yes that is the way the quakers do, but Jesus said “whose image and superscription is this.” Why did you apply the remarks to yourself? Why did you ask if we meant you?” , “then I understand you meant me” Joseph “you said it” “you shall hear from me.” Joseph (as Mayor), “I fine you $10 for that threat, and for disturbing the meeting.”
spoke in palliation of his brother , [p. 1910]
March 7 Now if they will not let the people bring in their produce, the people will not buy their goods; and the result will be, the merchants will get the spirit of mobocracy. Another man, (I will not call his name) has been writing to the Tribune some of the most disgraceful things possible to name. He says in that article, that there are a great many donations to the which have been appropriated to other purposes. His object evidently was to stigmatize the Trustee, and excite prejudice against us abroad. But I pledge myself that whoever has contributed any old shoes, harness, horses, waggons, or anything else, if he will come forward I will show that every farthing is on the book and has been appropriated for the building of the . I pledge myself that if he finds the first farthing that we cannot show where it has been appropriated I will give him my head for a foot ball. He also states that the cannot be built it costs so much:— who does not know that we can put the roof on the building this season if we have a mind to? By turning all the means from the , and doubling our diligence, we can do it. [HC 6:239]
There are men in our midst who are trying to build up themselves at our expense, and others who are watching for iniquity, and will make a man an offender for a word. The best way for such men is to be still. If I did not love men I would not reprove them, but would work in the dark as they do. As to who is the author of the article in the Tribune, read it, and you will see for yourselves. He is not a lawyer— he is nearer related to a doctor— a small man. (Mr. Mc.Neil enquired if he was the man) No; I do not know you; you are a stranger. But I will rest myself and give way for others.
Prest. arose and made a few remarks. He compared the lawyers to polliwags, wiglers and toads; he said they would dry up next fall
“Those characters I presume were made in gizzard making time, when it was cheaper to get gizzards than souls, for if a soul cost $5.00, a gizzard would cost nothing; like tree toads they change color to suit the object they are upon; they ought to be ferreted out like rats— you could describe them as you would a hedgehog; they are in every hedge stinking like the skunk.
asked if Joseph meant him. Joseph said, I will reply by asking you a question. “That is no way” Joseph “Yes that is the way the quakers do, but Jesus said “whose image and superscription is this.” Why did you apply the remarks to yourself? Why did you ask if we meant you?” , “then I understand you meant me” Joseph “you said it” “you shall hear from me.” Joseph (as Mayor), “I fine you $10 for that threat, and for disturbing the meeting.”
spoke in palliation of his brother , [p. 1910]
Page 1910