History, 1838–1856, volume E-1 [1 July 1843–30 April 1844]

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
Page 1935
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<​March 20​> and I am astonished that so little is known abroad concerning him.
was my favorite, and I was astonished to see Gen. Smith’s name as a competitor: but since my late acquaintance, can never re-seat himself in the presidential chair on my vote, while Gen. Smith is in the field; forming my opinions alone on the talents of the two; and from what I have seen, I have no reason to doubt, but Gen. Smith’s integrity is equal to any other individual; and I am satisfied he cannot easily be made the pliant tool of any political party. I take him to be a man who stands far aloof from little caucus quiblings and squablings, while nations, governments and realms, are wielded in his hand as familiarly as the top and hoop in the hands of their little masters.
Free from all bigotry and superstition, he dives into every subject, and it seems as though the world was not large enough to satisfy his capacious soul, and from his conversation, one might suppose him as well acquainted with other worlds as this.
So far as I can discover, Gen. Smith is the nation’s man, and the man who will exalt the nation, if the people will give him the opportu[HC 6:269]nity; and all parties will find a friend in him so far as right is concerned.
Gen. Smith’s movements are perfectly anomalous, in the estimation of the public. All other great men have been considered wise in drawing around them wise men; but I have frequently heard the General called a fool because he has gathered the wisest of men to his cabinet, but this subject is too ridiculous to dwell upon; suffice it to say, so far as I have seen, he has wise men at his side; superlatively wise, and more capable of managing the affairs of a state, than most men now engaged therein; which I consider much to his credit, though I would by no means speak diminutively of my old friends.
From my brief acquaintance, I consider Gen. Smith, (independent of his peculiar religious views, in which, by the by, I have discovered neither vanity nor folly,) the sine-qua-non of the age, to our nation’s prosperity He has learned the all important lesson, “to profit by the experience of those who have gone before,” so that, in short, Gen. Smith begins where other men leave off. I am aware this will appear a bold assertion to some, but I would say to such, call and form your acquaintance as I have done, then judge.
Thus, Sir, you have a few leading items of my views of Gen. Smith, formed from personal acquaintance, which you are at liberty to dispose of as you think proper. I anticipate the pleasure of renewing my acquaintance with your citizens at a future day.
Yours, Respectfully,
A Traveller.”
A writer in the Herald, reflects very strongly upon the conduct of the Whig, Tribune, and other Newspapers, for publishing slanderous falsehoods against the Saints. [p. 1935]
March 20 and I am astonished that so little is known abroad concerning him.
was my favorite, and I was astonished to see Gen. Smith’s name as a competitor: but since my late acquaintance, can never re-seat himself in the presidential chair on my vote, while Gen. Smith is in the field; forming my opinions alone on the talents of the two; and from what I have seen, I have no reason to doubt, but Gen. Smith’s integrity is equal to any other individual; and I am satisfied he cannot easily be made the pliant tool of any political party. I take him to be a man who stands far aloof from little caucus quiblings and squablings, while nations, governments and realms, are wielded in his hand as familiarly as the top and hoop in the hands of their little masters.
Free from all bigotry and superstition, he dives into every subject, and it seems as though the world was not large enough to satisfy his capacious soul, and from his conversation, one might suppose him as well acquainted with other worlds as this.
So far as I can discover, Gen. Smith is the nation’s man, and the man who will exalt the nation, if the people will give him the opportu[HC 6:269]nity; and all parties will find a friend in him so far as right is concerned.
Gen. Smith’s movements are perfectly anomalous, in the estimation of the public. All other great men have been considered wise in drawing around them wise men; but I have frequently heard the General called a fool because he has gathered the wisest of men to his cabinet, but this subject is too ridiculous to dwell upon; suffice it to say, so far as I have seen, he has wise men at his side; superlatively wise, and more capable of managing the affairs of a state, than most men now engaged therein; which I consider much to his credit, though I would by no means speak diminutively of my old friends.
From my brief acquaintance, I consider Gen. Smith, (independent of his peculiar religious views, in which, by the by, I have discovered neither vanity nor folly,) the sine-qua-non of the age, to our nation’s prosperity He has learned the all important lesson, “to profit by the experience of those who have gone before,” so that, in short, Gen. Smith begins where other men leave off. I am aware this will appear a bold assertion to some, but I would say to such, call and form your acquaintance as I have done, then judge.
Thus, Sir, you have a few leading items of my views of Gen. Smith, formed from personal acquaintance, which you are at liberty to dispose of as you think proper. I anticipate the pleasure of renewing my acquaintance with your citizens at a future day.
Yours, Respectfully,
A Traveller.”
A writer in the Herald, reflects very strongly upon the conduct of the Whig, Tribune, and other Newspapers, for publishing slanderous falsehoods against the Saints. [p. 1935]
Page 1935