History, 1838–1856, volume E-1 [1 July 1843–30 April 1844]

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
Page 1951
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<​April 6​> , , , and .
The Members of the High Council, an immense number of elders, and a <​very large​> concourse of people.
Saturday, April 6, 1844.
Presidents Joseph, and came to the at ¼ past 10 o’Clock, when the meeting was called to order by elder . The choir sung a hymn, after which President Joseph Smith rose to state to the congregation the nature of the business which would have to come before them. He stated that it had been expected by some that the little petty difficulties which have existed, would be brought up and investigated before this conference, but [HC 6:287] it will not be the case; these things are of too trivial a nature to occupy the attention of so large a body. I intend to give you some instruction on the principles of eternal truth, but will defer it until others have spoken, in consequence of the weakness of my lungs. The Elders will give you instruction, and then, (if necessary) I will offer such corrections as may be proper to fill up the interstices. Those who feel desirous of sowing the seeds of discord will be disappointed, on this occasion. It is our purpose to build up, and establish the principles of righteousness, and not to break down and destroy. The great Jehovah has ever been with me, and the wisdom of God will direct me in the seventh hour: I feel in closer communion and better standing with God than ever I felt before in my life, and I am glad of this opportunity to appear in your midst. I thank God for the glorious day that he has given us. In as large a congregation, it is necessary that the greatest order and decorum be observed; I request this at your hands, and believe that you will all keep good order.
Prayer was offered by , after which the choir sung a hymn.
Elder then rose and said:
“It is with no ordinary degree of satisfaction, I enjoy this privilege this morning; want of health and other circumstances have kept me in silence for nearly the last five years. It can hardly be expected, that when the violence of sickness having <​has​> used its influence, and the seeds of disease have so long preyed upon me, that I can rise before this congregation <​only in weakness​>. I am now come forth from a bed of sickness, and have enough of strength left to appear here for the first time in my true character <​I have not come before a Conference for the last five years in my true character​>. I shall consider this important privilege sacred in my family history during life. I hardly promise myself lungs to make this congregation hear me, I shall do the best I can, and the greatest can do no more.— The circumstances by which we are now surrounded points out the principles of my discourse— the history of this church which I have known from its infancy: my text is, ‘Behold the church of God of the last days.’ I do not know that I can find it in the Bible: I do not think it necessary to have Paul to make a text for me; I can make a text for myself; I recollect in the year 1830, I met the whole church of christ in a little old log house about 20 feet [p. 1951]
April 6 , , , and .
The Members of the High Council, an immense number of elders, and a very large concourse of people.
Saturday, April 6, 1844.
Presidents Joseph, and came to the at ¼ past 10 o’Clock, when the meeting was called to order by elder . The choir sung a hymn, after which President Joseph Smith rose to state to the congregation the nature of the business which would have to come before them. He stated that it had been expected by some that the little petty difficulties which have existed, would be brought up and investigated before this conference, but [HC 6:287] it will not be the case; these things are of too trivial a nature to occupy the attention of so large a body. I intend to give you some instruction on the principles of eternal truth, but will defer it until others have spoken, in consequence of the weakness of my lungs. The Elders will give you instruction, and then, (if necessary) I will offer such corrections as may be proper to fill up the interstices. Those who feel desirous of sowing the seeds of discord will be disappointed, on this occasion. It is our purpose to build up, and establish the principles of righteousness, and not to break down and destroy. The great Jehovah has ever been with me, and the wisdom of God will direct me in the seventh hour: I feel in closer communion and better standing with God than ever I felt before in my life, and I am glad of this opportunity to appear in your midst. I thank God for the glorious day that he has given us. In as large a congregation, it is necessary that the greatest order and decorum be observed; I request this at your hands, and believe that you will all keep good order.
Prayer was offered by , after which the choir sung a hymn.
Elder then rose and said:
“It is with no ordinary degree of satisfaction, I enjoy this privilege this morning; want of health and other circumstances have kept me in silence for nearly the last five years. It can hardly be expected, that when the violence of sickness has used its influence, and the seeds of disease have so long preyed upon me, that I can rise before this congregation only in weakness. I am now come forth from a bed of sickness, and have enough of strength left to appear here for the first time in my true character I have not come before a Conference for the last five years in my true character. I shall consider this important privilege sacred in my family history during life. I hardly promise myself lungs to make this congregation hear me, I shall do the best I can, and the greatest can do no more.— The circumstances by which we are now surrounded points out the principles of my discourse— the history of this church which I have known from its infancy: my text is, ‘Behold the church of God of the last days.’ I do not know that I can find it in the Bible: I do not think it necessary to have Paul to make a text for me; I can make a text for myself; I recollect in the year 1830, I met the whole church of christ in a little old log house about 20 feet [p. 1951]
Page 1951