History, 1838–1856, volume E-1 [1 July 1843–30 April 1844]

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
Page 1639
image
<​July 1​> passed which denounced all the citizens of these counties in the most bitter and rancorous manner. These resolutions were published in the papers, and the most extensive circulation given to them that the presses of the were capable of giving.
The first regular mob that assembled was in , and their efforts were directed against the settlements made in that county, declaring their determination to drive out of the county all the citizens who were of our religion, and that indiscriminately, without regard to any thing else but their religion. The only evidence necessary to dispossess any individual or family, or all the evidence required would be that they were Mormons, as we were called, or rather that they were of the Mormon religion. This was considered of itself crime enough to cause any individual or family to be driven from their homes, and their property made common plunder Resolutions to this effect were made at public meetings held for the purpose, and made public through the papers of the in the face of all law, and all authority.
I will now give a history of the settlement in Carroll county. In the preceding April, as and family were on our way to , we put up at a house in Carroll county, on a stream called Turkey creek, to tarry for the night. Soon after we stopped, a young<​erly​> man came riding up who also stopped and staid through the night. Hearing my name mentioned he introduced himself to me as , said he lived in that county at a little town called , on the , and had been at , to get some of those who were coming into that place, to form a settlement at : speaking highly of the advantages of the situation, and soliciting my interference in his behalf. to obtain a number of families to commence at that place, as he was a large proprietor in the town plat. He offered a liberal share in all the profits which might arise from the sale of property there, to those who would aid him in getting the place settled. In the morning we proceeded on our journey.
Some few weeks after my arrival, the said , in company with a man by the name of , came to on the [HC 3:450] same business; and after much solicitation on their part, it was agreed that a settlement should be made in that place, and in the July following, the first families removed there and the settlement soon increased, until in the October following, it consisted of some seventy families. By this time a regular mob had collected, strongly armed; and had obtained possession of a cannon, and stationed themselves a mile or two from the town. The citizens being nearly all new comers, had to live in their tents and wagons, and were exerting themselves to the uttermost to get houses for the approaching winter. The mob commenced committing their depredations on the citizens, by not suffering them to procure the materials for building, keeping them shut up in the , not allowing them to go out to get provisions, driving off their cattle, and preventing the owners from going in search of them. In this way the citizens were driven to the greatest extremities, actually suffering for food and every comfort of life, in consequence of which there was much sickness and many died; females gave birth to children without a house to shelter them, and in consequence of the exposure, many suffered great afflictions and many died.
Hearing of their great sufferings, a number of the men of determined on going to see what was doing there. Accordingly we started, eluded [p. 1639]
July 1 passed which denounced all the citizens of these counties in the most bitter and rancorous manner. These resolutions were published in the papers, and the most extensive circulation given to them that the presses of the were capable of giving.
The first regular mob that assembled was in , and their efforts were directed against the settlements made in that county, declaring their determination to drive out of the county all the citizens who were of our religion, and that indiscriminately, without regard to any thing else but their religion. The only evidence necessary to dispossess any individual or family, or all the evidence required would be that they were Mormons, as we were called, or rather that they were of the Mormon religion. This was considered of itself crime enough to cause any individual or family to be driven from their homes, and their property made common plunder Resolutions to this effect were made at public meetings held for the purpose, and made public through the papers of the in the face of all law, and all authority.
I will now give a history of the settlement in Carroll county. In the preceding April, as and family were on our way to , we put up at a house in Carroll county, on a stream called Turkey creek, to tarry for the night. Soon after we stopped, a youngerly man came riding up who also stopped and staid through the night. Hearing my name mentioned he introduced himself to me as , said he lived in that county at a little town called , on the , and had been at , to get some of those who were coming into that place, to form a settlement at : speaking highly of the advantages of the situation, and soliciting my interference in his behalf. to obtain a number of families to commence at that place, as he was a large proprietor in the town plat. He offered a liberal share in all the profits which might arise from the sale of property there, to those who would aid him in getting the place settled. In the morning we proceeded on our journey.
Some few weeks after my arrival, the said , in company with a man by the name of , came to on the [HC 3:450] same business; and after much solicitation on their part, it was agreed that a settlement should be made in that place, and in the July following, the first families removed there and the settlement soon increased, until in the October following, it consisted of some seventy families. By this time a regular mob had collected, strongly armed; and had obtained possession of a cannon, and stationed themselves a mile or two from the town. The citizens being nearly all new comers, had to live in their tents and wagons, and were exerting themselves to the uttermost to get houses for the approaching winter. The mob commenced committing their depredations on the citizens, by not suffering them to procure the materials for building, keeping them shut up in the , not allowing them to go out to get provisions, driving off their cattle, and preventing the owners from going in search of them. In this way the citizens were driven to the greatest extremities, actually suffering for food and every comfort of life, in consequence of which there was much sickness and many died; females gave birth to children without a house to shelter them, and in consequence of the exposure, many suffered great afflictions and many died.
Hearing of their great sufferings, a number of the men of determined on going to see what was doing there. Accordingly we started, eluded [p. 1639]
Page 1639