History, 1838–1856, volume E-1 [1 July 1843–30 April 1844]

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
Page 1806
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<​December 18​> that a conspiracy was formed against Joseph Smith and others, and that some of them would be shot. These conversations were had at different times. He thought Mr. Smith was a bad character. He thought they ought to be taken. Ques. Who? Joseph Smith, and some others. I told him he had been taken, but had been acquitted. He did not thank the for that. He carried the idea that there was a conspiracy against his life, and said we have a plan in operation that will pop him over.
sworn.
By the court. Is your residence in this ? Yes.
Messrs. and Styles, attorneys, resident in , made some thrilling remarks pertaining to the outrageous proceedings of . The diabolical conduct of those wretches who could be engaged in destroying and kidnapping their fellow men was portrayed in glowing colors. Judge Phelps and General Smith then followed on the same subject, their language was thrillingly eloquent, and powerful: if ever inhumanity and <​deeds​> of blood were depicted in their true colors, it was on that occasion; their thoughts flashed <​as​> fire and they spake in “words that burned’. We never saw the character of General Smith so clearly developed, for while he abhorred and depicted the fiendish crime that the culprit stood charged with in its true colors, he pitied the poor wretch that then stood before him, and with feelings of commiseration, benevolence and philanthropy, withdrew his charge, wished if it was in the power of the court that the culprit might be forgiven, promised to pay all the charges, and invited him and those of his friends who came along, to come to his house and they should be taken care of. It would be superfluous for us to attempt to give even a faint outline of the remarks made by the above named gentlemen, we hope to have at least a synopsis of their speeches for publication which we are sure would be highly interesting to our readers. Upon the whole, although a painful, yet it was an interesting occasion and will long be remembered, and unless ’s heart, and those of his friends, were made of adamant, it must have made an indellible impression on their minds and almost made them hate themselves.”
I received from Esqre. the following demand [HC 6:118]
“City of Dec. 18th. 1843. Sir. I have been informed that a writ issued by me for the body of for kidnapping will be resisted by an armed force. Therefore according to the provision to the charter, I wish you to order me a detachment of the Legion, say 100 men to enforce the law of the and bring the said to justice. J. P.”
which demand I complied with by writing to Major General
“City of , Dec 18, 1843. Sir, you will detach 100 men under the direction of a Justice of the Peace for the purpose of assisting the in executing the Law of the in taking who is charged with kidnapping , yours Joseph Smith, Lieut. Gen. N. L. Major Genl. . Commanding. Legion.”
who detached Col. with 100 men for that purpose.
about 10 p. m. two young men arrived as express, stating that a Mob was collecting at , also at Col. house; and Messengers had gone to the Mob in to reinforce their number there. [p. 1806]
December 18 that a conspiracy was formed against Joseph Smith and others, and that some of them would be shot. These conversations were had at different times. He thought Mr. Smith was a bad character. He thought they ought to be taken. Ques. Who? Joseph Smith, and some others. I told him he had been taken, but had been acquitted. He did not thank the for that. He carried the idea that there was a conspiracy against his life, and said we have a plan in operation that will pop him over.
sworn.
By the court. Is your residence in this ? Yes.
Messrs. and Styles, attorneys, resident in , made some thrilling remarks pertaining to the outrageous proceedings of . The diabolical conduct of those wretches who could be engaged in destroying and kidnapping their fellow men was portrayed in glowing colors. Judge Phelps and General Smith then followed on the same subject, their language was thrillingly eloquent, and powerful: if ever inhumanity and deeds of blood were depicted in their true colors, it was on that occasion; their thoughts flashed as fire and they spake in “words that burned’. We never saw the character of General Smith so clearly developed, for while he abhorred and depicted the fiendish crime that the culprit stood charged with in its true colors, he pitied the poor wretch that then stood before him, and with feelings of commiseration, benevolence and philanthropy, withdrew his charge, wished if it was in the power of the court that the culprit might be forgiven, promised to pay all the charges, and invited him and those of his friends who came along, to come to his house and they should be taken care of. It would be superfluous for us to attempt to give even a faint outline of the remarks made by the above named gentlemen, we hope to have at least a synopsis of their speeches for publication which we are sure would be highly interesting to our readers. Upon the whole, although a painful, yet it was an interesting occasion and will long be remembered, and unless ’s heart, and those of his friends, were made of adamant, it must have made an indellible impression on their minds and almost made them hate themselves.”
I received from Esqre. the following demand [HC 6:118]
“City of Dec. 18th. 1843. Sir. I have been informed that a writ issued by me for the body of for kidnapping will be resisted by an armed force. Therefore according to the provision to the charter, I wish you to order me a detachment of the Legion, say 100 men to enforce the law of the and bring the said to justice. J. P.”
which demand I complied with by writing to Major General
“City of , Dec 18, 1843. Sir, you will detach 100 men under the direction of a Justice of the Peace for the purpose of assisting the in executing the Law of the in taking who is charged with kidnapping , yours Joseph Smith, Lieut. Gen. N. L. Major Genl. . Commanding. Legion.”
who detached Col. with 100 men for that purpose.
about 10 p. m. two young men arrived as express, stating that a Mob was collecting at , also at Col. house; and Messengers had gone to the Mob in to reinforce their number there. [p. 1806]
Page 1806